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Easy US series to collect?


Burks
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Is there an easy "older" series to collect that doesn't have real big rarities? Nothing that is going to cost $200 in good condition.

 

Was thinking about doing the $1 Silver Certs or red seal $5. Don't really have a note Krause available as none of the 20 libraries in my area carry it (the one at the college isn't due back until next year.....damn extended borrowing).

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$1 Silver Certificates!

 

Very easy. I've been after that series for a few years now. I'm a youngin' too and in college so I would know which is a good series to do. I collect 1923 - 1957 with all signatures, designs, varieties, and star notes. I just counted and there are 53 total notes. I've only got ~37 or so. The ones remaining are pretty tough to find or cost a pretty penny. I think the most I've paid for any of the notes is ~$200. Can't remember. I'm looking forward to the Baltimore show in November to hunt down some of the tougher-to-find stars and letters. I'd like to find some notes earlier than 1923 too.

 

Anywho. I reccommend it. Some notes can be found in ChUnc for ~ $10. Others you'll have to shell out quite a bit for even a Good example. ($200 for a Good example of 1928E. $50,000 for an UNC 1928E STAR.)

 

I like them. But sometimes I feel bad because you always see the easier to find dates and letters for cheap in Ads. It doesn't seem like a series with prestige but even if you disregard the Star Notes and some other varieties, it is still a feat, in my opinion.

 

 

For anyone else replying to this thread: I'm looking for another US Currency Series to start myself. I'm thinking of expanding the Silvers to higher denoms. or chasing down some nice Gold Certs.

 

 

Hope that helps and that one day we'll be chattin' up the Silver Cert. series,

 

George

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Thanks for the great response. While at the local coin show I was keeping an eye out for notes. A lot of the red seal $2 notes were going for under $10. Most had one or two folds in them but very little wear. No clue what "grade" you would give it but they were most certainly very nice. If I hadn't already spent my budget I would of bought some.

 

I really have to go through my Grandpa's silver cert collection and see what he has. Probably have a good 30 or so of them.

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If I'm not mistaken, the Confederates produced notes that, today, could be considered sleepers (cheap and prolific). That would provide a good series for our academically-plagued budget.

 

I'd love to see what everyone else thinks about Confederate currency or other series.

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Confederates, Obsoletes [private and state issues prior to 1870], Military Payment Certificates [a/k/a MPC], WW II emergency issues [Hawaii notes and North Africa notes], money 'substitutes' [coupons resembling money to be used at a particular store or chain of stores, or for a particular product], Souvenir Cards [replicas of Large sized notes printed by the BEP and sold at various numismatic events].

 

All of the above can be collected for modest sums.

 

If you cannot collect high grade Large sized stuff, the Souvenir Cards are one way to get the beautiful designs as well as some unissued types [i.e., 1896 $10 Silver Cert. Never actually issued even though a plate was prepared]. Most of the over 200 BEP produced cards are available for less than $20 each on eBay or at dealers websites [www.kenbar.com comes to mind {shameless plug for my friend Ken}] or shows where they are issued.

 

The current series of cards are have higher issue prices than in the past at $20 per card. That is one BEP policy that I do not like at all; however, one can get a face plate print of the $1 1896 Silver Cert Education note for less than $10. These cards are all engraved and [for the most part] in the original colors. There are no serial numbers or plate position letters or numbers on them.

 

At nearly every show there will be a dealer with a 'junk box' which will likely contain MPC which were issued for use by our military forces in the field from the mid-1940's up untill the mid-1970's.

 

The 'POGS' used in Iraq and Iran by our military forces today should also be included as they are valid at any post, base or port exchange, even here in the US. They are in fractional denominations an, IIRC, about 200 or so different types or designs have been issued over the last 4 years or so.

 

Many Obsoletes are available in high grade for under $30 each. Lots of Obsolete dealers out there. They will also usually have Confed's, too.

 

Money substitutes are whereever you find'em. I've been 'acquiring' [i can't really call it a 'collection'] them since the late -1960's [off and on...mostly 'off' lately]. Lots of junk mail will contain'em.

 

As you can see, there are many ways ro scratch the itch caused by the bite of the collectiing bug and which won't cost you an arm, a leg or a first-born.

 

Good luck and keep us posted on where you finally light. Who knows, maybe some of us have just what you 'need'?!?

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  • 7 months later...

T_25.jpg

I'd love to see what everyone else thinks about Confederate currency or other series.

 

 

I may be a bit late coming to this forum, but I'd be happy to discuss Confederate notes with any who are interested. CSA notes are the ONLY thing I collect!

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T_25.jpg

I may be a bit late coming to this forum, but I'd be happy to discuss Confederate notes with any who are interested. CSA notes are the ONLY thing I collect!

 

No worries. You're always welcome to dig up dusty threads and topic. Welcome to CoinPeople!

 

I'm really interested in CSA notes for a couple of reasons. 1) I was born and raised in Richmond, Virginia and am a Civil War buff. 2) The history of the notes is fascinating. 3) They seem to be readily available and CHEAP! (for the mostpart).

 

My first questions for you are: what attracts about CSA notes? why not delve into USA notes? what do you think about CSA notes as a collectable in general (you think they're sleepers, they're underrated, they're becoming more popular, etc, etc, etc)?

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I'm really interested in CSA notes for a couple of reasons. 1) I was born and raised in Richmond, Virginia and am a Civil War buff. 2) The history of the notes is fascinating. 3) They seem to be readily available and CHEAP! (for the mostpart).

 

My first questions for you are: what attracts about CSA notes? why not delve into USA notes? what do you think about CSA notes as a collectable in general (you think they're sleepers, they're underrated, they're becoming more popular, etc, etc, etc)?

 

 

Thanks.

 

Taking your questions in order:

 

I am attracted to CSA notes partly because of the history. While I was born in the north but have no ancestral history of the American Civil War, I am a bit of a Civil War buff myself. I've spent many an evening reading and enjoying all three volumes of Shelby Foote's trilogy.

 

It is a short period of time, and a relatively small series of notes. Using the most common collector's system of cataloging (Criswell Type numbers, usually abbreviated "T" followed by a number) there are only 72 types in a "complete" set, and two of those (T-47 and T-48) have been determined to be rare bogus issues, no longer considered part of the set.

 

Among those types, there is a multiplicity of designs. This stems partly from the fact that the Confederacy, like the Union, did not have their own Bureau of Engraving and Printing at the time. The notes were printed by printing companies under contract with the Confederate government. Something like seven different companies were used, and at first, each designed the notes they printed. Only later were designs standardized, and frankly, these are among the less interesting, typically. The variety of 1861 notes is particularly enjoyable.

 

As you said, the history of the notes is fascinating. The earliest issues were printed in New York City, and smuggled South. This was stopped very early, so the T-1 through T-4 notes are rather rare. Only 607 each of T-1 and T-2 were ever issued. Only 1606 each of T-3 and T-4. When one adds into the mix, the various contemporaneous counterfeits, which today are highly collectible, it gets even more interesting. I have found that the more one learns about this series, the more interesting it becomes.

 

While there are many interesting early USA notes, the later ones become monotonous, at least in my opinion. People collect them by series and signature combinations, and the signatures are printed. ALL genuine CSA notes, with the exception of the two Fifty Cent types, were hand signed. I have actually identified dangerous counterfeits because I recognized that the signatures were forged -- I knew the handwriting of the real clerks, and that wasn't it!

 

As for your last question, I find them to be an excellent collectible. I have sold most of my coins to acquire notes I otherwise could not afford. Comparing rarity to price, they are considered a sleeper compared to early Federal notes. There was a big rise in price in the 1990s. Since then, prices have been relatively constant, edging up on the tougher notes. Dealers are finding it harder to get inventory in quantity. There could be some new price increases in the forseeable future. With many types having low survival rates, things could become rather more competetive. Right now, most collector's refer to "the Big Six." These are six notes most collector's can't afford, all of which have between 100 and about 165 surviving examples known. The next level, with perhaps 200 to 500 surviving examples of each, aren't going to get easier, or cheaper. If there comes a time when there are 1000 SERIOUS collectors active....

 

Right now, many of the common notes are still relatively cheap. There are definitely a few sleepers in the series that are tougher to find in nice condition than the prices seem to indicate. Some of the 1864 notes are around $50 in uncirculated. A good portion of the series can be gotten in VG to F or better for under $200 per note, including several of the 1861 notes. What the future holds?

 

If you're interested, my collection can be viewed at www.banknotebank.com/?collection=zaphod

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What an excellent post on Confederate notes!!! I learned a lot from that, thank you for posting it.

 

As for other suggestions of inexpensive ways to collect, with currency there are so many! You might try a birthyear set, for example if you were born in 1985 or 1988, you could try to assemble $1 notes from all FRBs for that particular year (in 1988 you have a bonus with the series 1988 A notes). You could collect a type set of small size $2 notes which it fairly inexpensive. Broken bank notes are fairly inexpensive, though they are so broad, you might want to narrow it a bit by focusing on a specific geographic area, like notes from the State of Virginia, or by odd denominations, I've always thought it would be fun to collect $3 and $4 notes. Fractional currency is still largely ignored and reasonably priced (I am still amazed at buying nice 125 year old paper notes for under $25!). CSA notes are neat, but there are even tangents there, I've thought it would be neat to collect notes issued by state governments in the Confederacy (after all, wasn't this about states' rights?). If you're like me and enjoy trains as well, you could collect old notes issued by railroads, many were even issued in fractional denominations so they could make change for purchasing tickets on the train!

 

There are many ways to go, and with currency, there are always interesting side streets to stumble upon in your collecting.

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As for other suggestions of inexpensive ways to collect, with currency there are so many!

 

If we go back to the first question in the original post, then Confederate currency does not apply. There ARE significant rarities, and many cost more than $200 for notes in good condition. A "rag" of a T-27 or T-35 would be something like $5000. (That's not a typo, five thousand.)

 

There are, fortunately other ways to collect Confederate notes. With unlimited funds, one could explore the world of variations, and there are many -- hence Fricke's 800 page tome. On the other end of the spectrum is something like an 1864 type set. This consists of nine notes, with face values of fifty cents, $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, and $500. In "average nice" VF condition, a dealer sells a set for $850.00. The most expensive note is the $500, and probably brings the average down a touch. (The $500 isn't rare, but it's popularity has driven the price up.) A set in CU runs about $1600.

T_64.jpg

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www.banknotebank.com/?collection=zaphod

 

Wow. Great answers, Z :ninja: I've got some follow up questions for you but I'll put them in their own thread in the Banknote forum.

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