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Barclays Bank (Canada) $10 1935

 

canadabarclaysbank101935dtl.jpg

 

canadabarclaysbank101935.jpg

 

Barclays Bank, while not a immediately familiar name, is actually one of Great Britain's oldest banking institutions. From a founding by goldsmith bankers in 1690 the bank gradually grew into a commercial banking firm and expanded cautiously through the 18th and 19th centuries. The bank's Canadian branch was incorporated in Montreal in 1929 and was a relatively late-comer to issuing banknotes in Canada - and only for a very surprisingly short time. Indeed there were only to be two issues of banknotes, in 1929 and 1935 as by that time the Bank of Canada was being formed and was amalgamating banknote issue into the Crown Corporation of Bank of Canada.

 

The bank approached the newly formed Canadian Banknote Company to contract print their banknotes, the title of the vignette is "Communication" and is represented by a young lady gazing over a globe depicting North America. The reverse of the note, printed in a very dramatic orange, depicts the bank's headquarters in Montreal.

 

Barclay's Bank never grew into a very large institution in Canada, with the passing of the Westminster Act in 1931 and greater autonomy for Canada's laws the influx of capital from the London office became more difficult with new currency controls. The effects of the Great Depression and then WWII also had an effect on the balance sheet and by 1956 the officers were approaching other bank's in the interests of merging their operations - subsequently Barclays Bank Canada was absorbed by Imperial Bank of Canada - now known as the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.

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Belgium 1 Franc - German Occupation - 1915

 

belgium1franc1915dtl.jpg

 

belgium1franc1915.jpg

 

 

In August 1914 in violation of Belgium's neutrality Germany invaded the country from the east, no doubt as part of their plan to invade France to the south through Belgium. The German occupation forces would subsequently start issuing paper money to supplement the Belgian economy during that time. The issues were very unpopular in Belgium, due in no small part to the fact that they were authorised by the German occupiers. The Germans were in a bit of a conundrum though, they couldn't exactly issue paper money with the portraits of King Albert I or Queen Elizabeth of Belgium - so they had to dig into Belgium's past for a historical figure. Marie-Louise of Orleans was the Queen consort of King Leopold I of Belgium, the first king of Belgium. Marie-Louise was the eldest daughter of Louis-Phillipe, then king of France from 1830-1848. She was a very shy and withdrawn young lady of twenty years of age when she married King Leopold in 1832, but would become very well regarded and loved by the Belgian people for her charity activities but she was also remarkable for her beauty.

 

marie-louise.belgium.jpg

 

I like the printing of this note, but admittedly having seen other portraits of Queen Marie-Louise I find that I am somewhat disappointed with her vignette on this note as it seems to not quite accurately portray her. In fact the image appears somewhat insipid, given that it is known she was very attractive. Sadly, she passed away at the age of 38 years in 1850 from tuberculosis.

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Two great notes there, S.A. I agree that the Belian note could have had better realism, but it ranks with the notgeld era notes, so only so much could be afforded I guess. That Canadian note is stunning! Absolutely wonderful vignette on that one! Congrats on the new notes!

:bthumbsup:

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Wow, nice 54s. Wonder how that set got put together. Some BoC official must've plucked them off the presses, you'd never assemble something that awesome from circulation or even from a bank. Either way, congrats on picking them up!!

 

Thanks William. This set was kept in Singapore for a long time. No foxing. All in perfect condition. Interestingly, Canadian collectors were wondering where are all the $100 solids. Only 4 pieces surface in the public including mine. According to a Canadian collector, there should be 19 pieces of $100 solids. Nobody know how many exist in collectors' hands or how many survive the circulation. An earlier $100 piece also came from Singapore and was put up in an auction. :unsure:

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Wow, nice 54s. Wonder how that set got put together. Some BoC official must've plucked them off the presses, you'd never assemble something that awesome from circulation or even from a bank.

 

The only two Canadian solids I've seen in person were both circulated '54 series, so I think that they did go off into circulation and were plucked out futher down the line at retail banks, or by collectors - and that a put together set, yes, is truly miraculous.

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Scotland has some realy nice notes.

 

From 1969, The Royal Bank of Scotland.

 

933109B.jpg

933109A.jpg

 

 

Beautiful note - Congrats! I've been looking for an UNC of this note and of P269 for a while now - no luck - Plenty of mangled ones for sale, but AU or UNC are impossible for me to find.

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Scotland has some realy nice notes.

 

From 1969, The Royal Bank of Scotland.

 

933109B.jpg

933109A.jpg

 

 

That note is significant for several reasons, Royal Bank and National Commercial had just previously merged - so a new design incorporating the Firth of Forth rail bridge from the National Commercial Bank and the new Firth of Forth Road bridge was designed - curiously for the newly formed bank the directors elected to call the bank "The Royal Bank of Scotland Limited" which was effectively a new name, but largely incorporated the old Royal Bank of Scotland name. I have seen a number of colour proofs, even purple, of this design. There are only two varieties, this one that has the two signatures with the Robertson signature carrying over from National Commercial. The next variety is a bit more common and only has Burke's signature on it as the director.

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Congrats on te new set! It's really nice. I knew you would be showing it off eventually! I wanted to, but I was strong.... I was even strong on the new Cayman Islands set - but for how long???

 

Sigh, I was not strong on the Cayman Island set ... I ordered a matching serial number set directly from the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority. I am waiting for them to arrive.

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Huh - Well it appears my note from Sweden that I've searched for for years is not to be mine, and is lost in the mail. Whaddya' do? It happens I guess. Really, though in all my years this is only the second note that's been lost, so... it still sucks.

 

But on a brighter side I did get thi snote today. Not the best, but okay for the likes of me I suppose.

 

2qwlaiu.jpg

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