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Guest Aidan Work

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Saor Alba - Great new set of ladies you've got there as always. I love teh countenance on "Reverie" - one not normally seen.

 

MMMM - I's call that a seal as well. Hasn't quite got the Coat of Arms feel to it.

 

 

Here's a new note I got in today: First and only USA MPC

 

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Dave - Thank you. I put "seal" in my description but just saw something similar and it was called a medallion. A "seal" looks more like it to me as well. By the way nice note, may I ask were did you find that MPC? I have been looking for the one with the Bufflao on it, but so far I have only found Replicas in anything better than good condition.

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Dave - Thank you. I put "seal" in my description but just saw something similar and it was called a medallion. A "seal" looks more like it to me as well. By the way nice note, may I ask were did you find that MPC? I have been looking for the one with the Bufflao on it, but so far I have only found Replicas in anything better than good condition.

 

 

I just got it off Ebay from a trusted seller. He had only two MPC's and unfortunately not the Buffalo one. If I see one around, I'll let you know about it.

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By the way nice note, may I ask were did you find that MPC? I have been looking for the one with the Bufflao on it, but so far I have only found Replicas in anything better than good condition.

 

 

The one with the buffalo on it is the Series 692:

 

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These are fairly common notes, last that were issued to American servicemen. It is from the most beautiful series of the MPC's that were issued. The Buffalo on there also famously appeared on this note nearly 70 years before:

 

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Yes they are common, but I would like one in good shape. Also I am very weary of buying one, there appears to be a lot of replicas floating around. Beside these two are there any other banknotes that Pablo appears on.

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Yes they are common, but I would like one in good shape. Also I am very weary of buying one, there appears to be a lot of replicas floating around. Beside these two are there any other banknotes that Pablo appears on.

 

Yep, I know of one, but Pablo swore me to secrecy about it. :evilbanana:

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I received this in the mail today is a Costa Rica 5 Pesos from 1899, P-S163r. This is the first time I bought remnant. Not realy sure if it was a good deal.

 

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Yeah, I don't know if the price is going to hold on these, but they sure are great looking banknotes, though! I really like that lion! Congrats - Deal or not, it's yours and it's cool!

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A couple I didn't post yet:

 

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In a formal recognition of what had been a long reality, the Austrian and Hungarian Kingdoms were united as the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1867, though they had long shared the same monarchs. In an age of empires the Austro-Hungarian Empire was one of the most diverse in terms of the multitudes of ethnicities that were encompassed within it's borders. The Empire was then Central Europe's largest nation-state, ruling an area that stretched from what is now western Austria, to the Adriatic Sea, the Balkans and a large area of the former Jugoslavia and into what is now Ukraine.

 

Notes of the state treasury continued to be issued from before the formation of the Austro-Hungarian Empire on up until 1881. Then this issue was released into circulation, with allegorical vignettes of both Austria and Hungary flanking the design of the note. In essence, the nascent stages of what would be several amazingly well designed banknotes began. Curiously with this first issue in 1881 the designs were the same from front to reverse - save the different languages used on both sides - German and Hungarian.

 

Even with the redenomination of the Gulden currency in 1892 and the adoption of the Krone - Korona currency that year, the Gulden paper money continued to be used until 1902 when it was finally replaced with the Krone - Korona denominated currency at a rate of 1 Gulden:2 Korona, therefore realising Austria-Hungary's adoption of the Latin Monetary Unit as it's currency value. This note lost it's legal tender status in 1902.

 

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Bank of Scotland is Scotland's oldest financial institution, and the only one that was originally constituted by an act of the Scottish Parliament. Curiously Bank of England was founded by a Scotsman the previous year, and Bank of Scotland was founded by an Englishman named John Holland - he would be naturalised as a Scot to permit him to do business in Scotland. Bank of Scotland commenced note issue in 1695, all notes until 1730 were issued in Scots tenor, basically Scottish sterling. So a £12 in Scots tenor was equal to £1 in English tenor. Later notes were issued as standard British sterling in Pounds and Guineas - the latter being the equivalent of £1/1/-

 

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Daniel(1754-1812) and William Lizars(1788-1859) were a father and son that were early 19th century Scotland's finest engravers and printers. In their profession they engraved many early banknote plates in copper as well as many other prints. Their attention to detail is abundant in this proof note that was printed ca. 1810 for the value of One Guinea.

 

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This particular vignette has "Scotia" in the centre, flanked by thistles and the legend in Latin Tanto Uberior - "So much more plentiful". This particular vignette has an amazing attention to fine detail that was rather common for Scottish printed notes of the era, a factor that was curiously as omnipresent on contemporary English printed notes.

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BTW I find sad how this king is dressed 'a la european old general with 1001 war medals' it reminds me of those first aborigenal putting Cpt. Cook hat on their heads, no disrespect, but really out of their culture, something that is NOT tongan (or pacific)

 

the new notes of tonga show even more details on his dress and medal.

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Tonga has the distinction of being one of the last absolute monarchies in the world, in "good" company with countries like Saudi Arabia and Oman. It is no surprise their previous monarch gave himself so many medals. He probably got one for filling the toilet every morn. His mug on the note reminds me of Idi Amin on the Ugandan notes.

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Well, I received the last of my old French notes, I now have 2,000 worthless francs! These are the type I used when working in Paris in 1995, so they have some sentimental value I suppose (even though I bought them on eBay!). The 500-franc was always entertaining since we said it looked like Pascal had a migraine from trying to fit the ginormous 500-franc note into his wallet!

 

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Can you imagine Liberte on a modern American banknote? I don't remember ever using the Pascal notes, but remember the Monte's well and on down to Debussy on the 10 or 20. I did use some of the Curie 500FF and Eiffel 200FF when I was last there,haven't been back to France since Franc days.

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of course being just out of college a couple years, we loved the 100! I remember the 20F with DeBussy they were so common! The 50-franc I hardly remember using, the only thing I remember is that was the only one of the new series we saw, a bright blue Saint-Exupery note! All the rest were the old style with the super thin paper.

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I had a St. Ex 50FF in uncirculated, and wisht I had kept it. Sometime I wanna do a pilots and aircrafts thematic collection. I remember having one time a whole bundle of the earlier 50FF notes that were largely monocolour - Quentin de la Tours? Anyway those were like play money and I never saved them, only spent them to buy up rolls of coins in banks. And being laughed at by cashiers for buying the 100FF coins in silver - being told they would be worthless!

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