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Guest Aidan Work
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btw, is that Northern Ireland currency commonly(massively) used in that country ?(or it's more a collector-political stuff) ?

 

As far as I know, it's the only currency that is legal tender in Northern Ireland. I have never heard that they could use other notes, such as Scottish or English banknotes on par with their own, though I'd suspect there is a bit of acceptance with tourism, etc. Interesting question though. I've heard that the English don't like the Guernsey or Isle of Man or Gibraltar notes to circulate, but I have no idea if those islands accept other notes.

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As far as I know, it's the only currency that is legal tender in Northern Ireland. I have never heard that they could use other notes, such as Scottish or English banknotes on par with their own, though I'd suspect there is a bit of acceptance with tourism, etc. Interesting question though. I've heard that the English don't like the Guernsey or Isle of Man or Gibraltar notes to circulate, but I have no idea if those islands accept other notes.

 

It is NOT legal tender in Northern Ireland, nor is anything other than British coin legal tender in Scotland. Historically when Britain issued Ten Shilling(until 1970) and One Pound notes(1984) they were legal tender in all of Britain. Basically as promissary notes they have no legal tender status, but are commonly accepted by merchants and even in court challenges have been held to be acceptable money.

 

NI notes trade at a nominal discount in Europe, though curiously Scottish notes trade at a 1% advantage in some traders in Europe.

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mali100dtl1.jpg

 

mali100.jpg

 

mali100dtl2.jpg

 

One I waited patiently a long time for, this 100 francs note was issued in Mali beginning in 1972 and saw very heavy use. Finding nice crisp uncirculated notes from this issue are next to impossible. There are lots of treated, cleaned, and pressed notes out there - but this one has nice heavy embossing from the day it was printed.

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It is NOT legal tender in Northern Ireland, nor is anything other than British coin legal tender in Scotland. Historically when Britain issued Ten Shilling(until 1970) and One Pound notes(1984) they were legal tender in all of Britain. Basically as promissary notes they have no legal tender status, but are commonly accepted by merchants and even in court challenges have been held to be acceptable money.

 

NI notes trade at a nominal discount in Europe, though curiously Scottish notes trade at a 1% advantage in some traders in Europe.

 

 

Ah, of course. +1 Saor Alba! That is an important fact. I should have said that I thought that they are the only 'Accepted' or 'Authorized' banknotes in NI. MauMauNotes brings up a great question, I think. I would think that in Ireland, these notes dominate, and like most places with their own currency, they are preferred for use when possible, even if the other notes are allowed by law or by custom.

 

As I wondered about the crown dependencies, possesions, etc with their own curency, I went to Wikipedia and found a plethora of information. The section on everyday ise and acceptance perhaps best answers Mau Mau Notes' question. Link

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I am familiar with the legal situation with Northern Ireland and the British Isles, but the other place where commercial banknotes circulate is Hong Kong where you have three commercial banks circulating notes along with the government of China and frankly I don't know what legal standing they have as tender.

 

The joint stock banking system that was created in Scotland during the 18th century resulted in a safeguard against large scale bank failures. There were a couple of sequesters, that resulted in notes being paid out in dividends over a period of time - but the only catastrophic failure was the City of Glasgow Bank in the 1870's. In very sharp contrast to England where bank failures were a near daily occurrence.

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  • 2 weeks later...

mexico500pesos2010.jpg

mexico500pesos2010dtl.jpg

 

Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, so Mexico, and so appropriate for this brand new $500 note issued in September 2010 by Banco de Mexico. Artists, writers, leftist political agitators extraordinaire - and tempestuous lovers whose radical ideas shocked conservative Mexican society in the early 20th century. This note commemorates their lives, and their art, with a self portrait of Frida Kahlo on the reverse of the note with a vignette from another of her works.

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You know, I had just seen a blurry photo of N. Koreas Kim Jong Un, and when I first glimpsed this note, I thought "Wow! They've wasted no time!" But then quickly realized my mistake. Then I saw the nude in what at first seemed to me like standing on a balcony with arms spread out to several sombrero wearing guys, and then I quickly realized it wasn't..... Maybe I need glasses? Maybe it's better without?

 

Nice note though, Saor Alba. When my eyes adjusted properly, I could appreciate it for it's intended design, instead of my temporary fabricated myopic one.

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Well, when I got home the Postman stopped off and was nice enough to hand me this so I would n't have to go fetch it from the post office tomorrow! Thought that was very decent of him.

 

Michigan, Bank of Chippeway 2 Dollars dated 1838. My first 'broken' or 'wildcat' banknote. Think it may be a remainder, but I couldn't pass it up.

 

2hn4dom.jpg

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