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Some more Russian coins this month.


gxseries
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This month there was a coin fair in Sydney and it had been pretty interesting. Most dealers are out of Russian coins as I pretty much emptied them except for the higher end rubles, like a 1741 Ivan III overstruck ruble. Yet I managed to find some interesting ones.

 

This month too isn't too bad as I managed to find THREE Russian error coins alone!

 

However let's start with the ones that are NOT the ones that I got from the fair.

 

This was one coin that I was talking about some time ago, that I thought I saw something:

 

18122kwt3.jpg

 

Except, I guess there must have been some kind of optic illusion or such, and when I received the coin, it was this:

 

915431.jpg

 

I pretty much sank when I realized I paid a lot more for the postage than for the coin. That's a loss :D I think I made up for the rest. ;)

 

Next is an error coin, which well it's actually a die clash:

915432.jpg

 

Not too noticeable unless you look closely in the centre of the "15 kopek" and the bottom of the Soviet crest. Interesting how someone tried to cover up the damage, or probably just some harsh cleaning. ;)

 

Now the rest are from the coin fair.

 

915433.jpg

 

Notice, this is a paper token, but what is interesting is that there were no 50 kopeks minted in that time, AND what is more interesting is if you realized, the background design is awfully similar to Tsarist copper coins. And what is puzzling is that there were similar Soviet TRIAL coins designs that appeared around that time! :ninja: What is this paper token supposed to be? It definately is a fantasy issue, but similar trial designs were designed except in lower denomination...

 

915435.jpg

Nothing impressive about this coin, except it's UNC, and it is a 1 year type. (Is it?)

 

915434.jpg

Paul I silver 5 kopeks. NOT impressive, but NOT easy to find at the same time. Tell me when you see one ;) I found it amazingly difficult to find such examples. The last time I saw this coin was actually two years ago while I had the chance. Someone else actually bought the coin when I was foolish enough not to buy it. And some twist of fate, he must have returned it back to the dealer. I didn't hesistate to buy it when I saw it back on sale. All I need is the 10 and 25 kopek silver coin, and I don't mind if they are in total battered up quality. The rest of Paul I's copper coins should be fairly easy to find, including the Polushka, if I spend enough time to hunt down...

 

915436.jpg

1988 restrike of the 1965 20th Anniversary of Liberation from Facist Germany. Had to pick it up when I saw Husslo mentioning about it.

 

Now finally, two quite dramatic error coins ;)

 

915438.jpg

Firstly the dealer actually marked it as a 1750 denga, but it is a 1730, especially when I realized it's an overstruck coin. What's even better is that it's actually a ~10 degrees rotated error coin! No, I didn't rotate the coin just to fake this picture up. Look at the clipped area and compare it with the reverse. Dealer failed to notice this too :lol:

 

And lastly, the most ridicious error that I have never seen before:

 

915437.jpg

 

This is a novodel restruck in 1988. But this is definately an error coin. I'll be cruel and let you find out what the error is :cry:

 

Hope you enjoyed reading :D

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915433.jpg

 

Notice, this is a paper token, but what is interesting is that there were no 50 kopeks minted in that time, AND what is more interesting is if you realized, the background design is awfully similar to Tsarist copper coins. And what is puzzling is that there were similar Soviet TRIAL coins designs that appeared around that time! :ninja: What is this paper token supposed to be? It definately is a fantasy issue, but similar trial designs were designed except in lower denomination...

 

The ribbon on the reverse of the piece is suggestive of the Tsarist bronze coins, ie the kopek-5 kopek coins. The 5 Kopek of 1911 is the last piece I need right now, I have all others in AU-BU.

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gx,

 

 

Your proof 1983 Engels commemorative is listed in Rylov & Sobolin at 6,000 rubles while the 1985 version of the same coin is listed at only 300 rubles.

 

I'm not sure how this happened, but the 165th anniversary of the birth of Karl Marx was 1983 while the 165th anniversary for Friedrich Engels was 1985.

 

Rylov & Sobolin list the 1983 Engels in proof only. Maybe the Engels portrait was somehow muled with the reverse of the proof Marx issue to create the 1983 error?

 

Congratulations on spotting this error coin. I would almost certainly have overlooked it had the coin been offered to me (being relatively ignorant of the post-Imperial coins).

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Now the price of 6000 rubles (200usd) is a shocker :lol: - I wasn't expecting it to be price catalogued or such.

 

The credits actually goes to the dealer who properly attributed it as a 1988 Novodel, but later lists it "error date?" - obviously I didn't hesitate to get it when he mentioned it as the rest is history :cry: Price paid for the coin: around 10usd :ninja:

 

For those who are finding this story a bit difficult to understand, here are some illustrations:

 

Russia 1985 1 ruble commemorating the 165th birth anniversary of Fredrik Engels.

910485.jpg

 

Russia 1983 1 ruble commemorating the 165th Anniversary since the birth of Karl Marx (and the 100th anniversary of his death).

910474.jpg

 

I too was speculating about this bizarre error and perhaps creating the mule. And when I did a search, it seems that this type of error is known for some time: http://shiraliv.narod.ru/Vyp_24.htm

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Now the price of 6000 rubles (200usd) is a shocker :lol: - I wasn't expecting it to be price catalogued or such.

 

The credits actually goes to the dealer who properly attributed it as a 1988 Novodel, but later lists it "error date?" - obviously I didn't hesitate to get it when he mentioned it as the rest is history :cry: Price paid for the coin: around 10usd :ninja:

 

 

Congratulations on an astute purchase. The Rylov-Sobolin book was published in Moscow in 1994. Attached is a scan of the relevant listing from my copy of the book.

 

The 2005 Krause catalog lists it at $55 with normal proofs in the $4-$6 range.

 

I can't speak with any certainty about the Soviet listings, but the 2005 Krause prices for Imperial issues seem low compared to what the coins usually bring in the real world.

 

post-383-1155363622.jpg

Rylov.jpg

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OMG!!! And I really thought the digit 6000 was just one digit too much!!! :lol::cry:

 

What was I doing all these years without any proper price catalogue for ALL areas of Russian coins? :ninja:

 

I didn't know this coin even existed until you posted your example. But I'm a newbie when it comes to Soviet issues because I've never really paid much attention to them until recently (even though I do have the odd Soviet coin hanging around).

 

Congratulations on your good fortune! It's a nice surprise to find an overlooked treasure in today's Russian coin market.

 

In order to read the Rylov & Sobolin listings, here is the meaning of each column for the coins listed:

 

1. Year

2. Mintage

3. Subject/Event

4. Number of Varieties and/or Rarity (6 degrees of rarity with Р = Scarce or Unusual Coin & Р5 = Unique). "Р" is the first letter of "Редкий" (meaning "rare").

5. Price in Rubles

6. Price in US dollars, apparently taken from the Krause catalog listings of the time (1994).

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