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1917 kopeks sure cost a fair amount!!!


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The most important thing about 1917... was that it was the very last year of the Tsar.

 

And so, such coins are pretty "scarce" and difficult to find in UNC condition.

 

10 kopeks

 

15 kopeks

 

20 kopeks

 

You should be checking if you have any of these coins... I now know that I will never be able to complete a type set of Nicholas minor silver denomination set :ninja:

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The most important thing about 1917... was that it was the very last year of the Tsar.

 

And so, such coins are pretty "scarce" and difficult to find in UNC condition.

 

10 kopeks

 

15 kopeks

 

20 kopeks

 

You should be checking if you have any of these coins... I now know that I will never be able to complete a type set of Nicholas minor silver denomination set :ninja:

 

Luckily I picked these three up a long time ago. The lowest price was paid for the 15 kopecks about 1962 when an advertisement from a coin dealer offered this coin for $1 and at the same time a gem 1912 Borodino ruble for $12.50. How prices have changed.

 

I am still mssing three of the minor silvers for Nicholas II: 1912 BC 20 kopecks, 1913 EB 20 kopecks, and the 1904 5 kopecks. With prices at their current high level, I expect to be mssing them for a long time. (The 1904 is impossible anyway.)

 

I might mention in passing that several of the minor silver are known in proof only, in particular the 1913 EB series and the 1901 AR 20 kopecks.

 

RWJ

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You know Julian, it seems that it was only these 5 years that prices blew to ridicious prices. I remember paying around 70-80USD for my Borodin ruble, assuming that it is a genuine, a crappy Column ruble for 100 and the "damaged" Column proof ruble for 350 or so. Just recently, most of them are hitting at least 4 figures in XF... That Borodin price of 12.50 is really unbeatable!

 

Geez, 1962 is REALLY a long time - I wasn't even born then!

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I might mention in passing that several of the minor silver are known in proof only, in particular the 1913 EB series and the 1901 AR 20 kopecks.

Weren't 1912-BC also only made as proofs?
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Weren't 1912-BC also only made as proofs?

 

I am not sure about the 1912 BC 20 kopecks but my 1912 BC 15 kopecks is Unc. I seem to recall that one of the Russian auctions had a proof of either the 15 or 20 kopecks. I do know that both of the BC issues for 1912 were considered rare in 1916, the 20 kopecks the most difficult.

 

The 1899 EB 15 kopecks may be a proof-only issue. Mine is in proof and I have not seen any circulation issues.

 

RWJ

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You know Julian, it seems that it was only these 5 years that prices blew to ridicious prices.

 

 

Russian coins started climbing in the early to mid-1990's and I remember thinking that they were starting to get expensive back then. :ninja::cry:

 

Of course, those "expensive" prices are nothing but a fond memory now because, as you say, prices have gone much, much higher in recent years. :lol:

 

This kind of wild price escalation usually suggests to me that a market collapse might not be far off (like US coins after the 1979-81 price insanity).

 

On the other hand, Russian coins have over 70 years of pent-up domestic demand (i.e. the Soviet period) to overcome, so prices and demand might not cool off for a while yet.

 

I wish the prices would stabilize for a while because it gets hard to know what is a fair price to pay for anything anymore.

 

Geez, 1962 is REALLY a long time - I wasn't even born then!

 

It's not that long ago. Some of us young folks still remember it. ;)

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You know Julian, it seems that it was only these 5 years that prices blew to ridicious prices. I remember paying around 70-80USD for my Borodin ruble, assuming that it is a genuine, a crappy Column ruble for 100 and the "damaged" Column proof ruble for 350 or so. Just recently, most of them are hitting at least 4 figures in XF... That Borodin price of 12.50 is really unbeatable!

 

Geez, 1962 is REALLY a long time - I wasn't even born then!

 

It might date me a little but I began collecting Russian material in the early 1950s, before I was in high school. You are of course right about the price explosion. I thought prices were way too high at the Renaissance sale of August 2000 in Philadelphia but in hindsight they were cheap! At that sale, for example, I picked up the 1775 MMD ruble at under $2000 (counting those pesky buyer's fees), which of course seems like a bargain today.

 

RWJ

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Forgive my lack of respect, now that I seem to be awfully young compared to the rest of the members here ;)

 

Indeed it seems to be true that after the fall of the Soviet Union and ownership of any property seems to be easier, I would probably point after 2000 when Russian economy started to perform better globally after the economy crash in 1998.

 

It would be nice if the prices start to become more stable as it has been ridiciously fluctent especially these couple of years. What is more evident is the number of Russians and ex-Soviet nations, particularly Ukrainians, Poles, and the Baltic nations are all very strong collectors. Ironically, the extras that I had and got sold all went to them because they were willing to pay top dollars.

 

While the rarities of Russian coins, like trial, commemorative should continue on raising further, I think it is inevitable that the market would crash eventually, but perhaps in 10 years time or so. I mean, if you take a good look at some prices, people are willing to pay crazy prices for crappy G coins for some prices that I used to pay perhaps a XF at good times, or even better - people willing to pay top dollars for counterfeits when they think they get them at a steal. ;)

 

A simple calculation of inflation that I did with my Russian coins over the years have yieided easily around 2-15% per annum! :lol: Probably the top few coins would be at 20-30%, and banks wouldn't give such good rates! :ninja: (a good reason why I am not selling too quick)

 

And Julian, nice pick up for the 1775 MMD ruble!!! :cry:;)

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The prices on the 1917 coins might seem high, but because of their historical significance and their rarity, I find them easier to understand than some other things sold on ebay.

 

For example, see this lot of Soviet proof(?) sets 1974-80 in an album with two 1980 proof olympics 1 ruble coins which just brought an astounding $255.66 plus shipping on ebay. :ninja:

 

While I admit I am fairly ignorant of the Soviet series, I didn't think these sets were so scarce as to command such a sum, nor did I think they were in such apparently strong demand. I would have predicted a final price below $100, so I guess that just shows how very little I know about them.

 

Amazing!

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The prices on the 1917 coins might seem high, but because of their historical significance and their rarity, I find them easier to understand than some other things sold on ebay.

 

For example, see this lot of Soviet proof(?) sets 1974-80 in an album with two 1980 proof olympics 1 ruble coins which just brought an astounding $255.66 plus shipping on ebay. :lol:

 

While I admit I am fairly ignorant of the Soviet series, I didn't think these sets were so scarce as to command such a sum, nor did I think they were in such apparently strong demand.  I would have predicted a final price below $100, so I guess that just shows how very little I know about them.

 

Amazing!

 

Appearently it was the only last TWO years that prices of such Soviet mint sets have blown up to some ridicious prices. I am personally shocked over this, but appearently this was only noted by a reputable dealer who noticed the variences and put them on auction. Ever since then, prices of such mint sets have gone to ridicious prices, and perhaps making people hope that they might be able to find varities in them. I personally can't remember what year the mint set was and there should be a catalogue on this topic too... except I can't remember what it is too... :ninja:

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Appearently it was the only last TWO years that prices of such Soviet mint sets have blown up to some ridicious prices. I am personally shocked over this, but appearently this was only noted by a reputable dealer who noticed the variences and put them on auction. Ever since then, prices of such mint sets have gone to ridicious prices, and perhaps making people hope that they might be able to find varities in them. I personally can't remember what year the mint set was and there should be a catalogue on this topic too... except I can't remember what it is too... :ninja:

 

I've never been much of a variety fan, especially for varieties that I need a microscope to see. The Soviet series has, with only a few exceptions, struck me as fairly monotonous, particularly since the 1961 issue, and therefore of very limited interest.

 

My 1957 set from the Bank for Foreign Trade was one I bought for very little money - maybe a dollar or two at the most. At the time, I had the distinct impression that the dealer I bought it from was happy to find someone who was willing to pay anything at all for it.

 

I guess things have changed since then. :lol:

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The prices on the 1917 coins might seem high, but because of their historical significance and their rarity, I find them easier to understand than some other things sold on ebay.

 

For example, see this lot of Soviet proof(?) sets 1974-80 in an album with two 1980 proof olympics 1 ruble coins which just brought an astounding $255.66 plus shipping on ebay. :ninja:

 

While I admit I am fairly ignorant of the Soviet series, I didn't think these sets were so scarce as to command such a sum, nor did I think they were in such apparently strong demand.  I would have predicted a final price below $100, so I guess that just shows how very little I know about them.

 

Amazing!

 

The 1976 set contains at least 1 coin (the 20 kopecks) which apparently was not struck for circulation. I agree, however, that the price for this group of sets seems much too high but in these days one never knows what will happen. The 1974-75 sets, I think, are only slightly scarce but the 1977-80 sets are, so far as I am aware, fairly common.

 

RWJ

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Geez, 1962 is REALLY a long time - I wasn't even born then!

Interestingly enough, this is apporximately when Mr. Forbes began collecting his Fabergé eggs which were sold in 2004 to the Russian industrialist and financier Viktor Vekselberg. Nine of the imperial eggs and some non-imperial eggs are on display right now in Zürich! (I just saw them yesterday ... :ninja::cry:;):lol: ...)

 

According to the catalog of the exhibition, the two most valuable imperial eggs (Coronation Egg and Lilies of the Valley Egg) TOGETHER cost Mr. Forbes about one million dollars. Today, the Coronation Egg alone is valued at between $18M-$24M and

the other one at $15M-$18M.

 

If you never saw any of these, here's a good place to start: Fabergé and Forbes (on the Forbes.com website)

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I saw the eggs in San Diego in the 1980s. If you ever have the chance, don't let it pass by. My son, 5 years old at the time, was enchanted by them. He was small enough to work through the crowds to the front and see everycase up close and at eye level with the eggs.

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I saw the eggs in San Diego in the 1980s. If you ever have the chance, don't let it pass by. My son, 5 years old at the time, was enchanted by them. He was small enough to work through the crowds to the front and see everycase up close and at eye level with the eggs.

And I'll bet that he probably still has some memory of them. :ninja: They are true art treasures.

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