Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

Davobenz

Members
  • Content Count

    24
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Davobenz

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 06/28/1946

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • Interests
    World coins, ancients to modern
  1. VERY obvious that these coins are ONE CROWN coins with that sort of design!
  2. I once had a complete Australian silver and bronze type set, where each type was represented by the rarest date, except for the 1930 Penny. That type was represented by a 1925 penny. Condition ranged from good VF to FDC. The set was old way back in 1976 along with a 17 coin Australian gold type set, to help raise money for a deposit for our first home. Sold three ancient gold coins as well, along with a few Roman bronze and silver coins. I have rebuilt a new collection since then, but in ancient and World coins.
  3. I once had a complete Australian gold type set, complete with an Adelaide Pound, type 2. Ten sovereigns with the first and second obverses and with the Adelaide one pound. All seven half sovereigns, all from the Sydney Mint. Five were British types but with the 'S' Sydney mint mark, and the two earliest of the first and second obverse head types, but with the distinctive SYDNEY MINT reverse design. 17 coins in all. The Sydney Mint building still exists, but as an Australian heritage museum. The set was sold way back in 1976, to help raise mone fou our first home. These days and sin
  4. I have a reasonably valuable collection (maybe $50k+) amassed over a period of 40 years or so. My rule of thumb is to collect and study what interests you, gain wide ranging numismatic knowledge (covering the whole of numismatics), and only buy what represents good value for money at the time of purchase. That way, you are in a position to much more easily find bargains. After that, FORGET about the value of your collection, either as individual coins or as a whole collection. When I die, my kids should make a a 'killing', provided the collection finds it's way to a good public auction
  5. It gold 5 (value whatever it is) suggests that their goal is to rule the Wolrd Roman emperor Trajan had the title Rector orbis (Ruler of the World). Obviously, he had never heard of America or China. The Nazis had the idea as master race, to rule the whole World. They didn't. Islamic State won't either. Do you want to collet their coins? That's up to you. Perhaps I may collect I.S. coins after their regime has been consigned to history. Thats' when and why I have a few Nazi and DDR coins.
  6. Potential value would not justify the grading and shipping fees.
  7. I have found the strangest things in my shoes: House keys that had accidentally fallen into a shoe and had been lost for some hours - a big problem when you are living alone, because there is no one else to help you find them. As a teenager, I found a funnel web spider (atrax robustus) in a shoe - another big problem, because they are the deadliest spider species on Earth, quite capable of killing you within an hour so, with their neurotoxin. Required hospitalisation. My kid brother rather facesioisly said that I was always going to survive, because I had no brains anyway! I have
  8. My rule of thumb is that if the potential value when graded is less than $100, grading and shipping fees are not justified.
  9. ikaros: At least you seem to be well heeled!
  10. Had a look at the 20 history gold price graph. A line of best fit for a 20 year period would suggest that the spot price may go as low as U.S.$800. For investment hedge purposes, the time span you are looking at for gold, should be selected according to your investment horizon. If you want to hedge into or out of a gold positon, the best way is to use dollar price average buying or selling over a period of time, that best suits your investment needs and horizon. My first gold coin was bought when I was a teenager. I still have it, more than 50 years later. The volativity of the curr
  11. Gold is an international commodity. All commodity prices are trending down just now. Watch the gold / silver ratio trend, as well as beyond the current downturn in the World economy. Gold should be a better hedge against inflation after that. In the last 50 years or so, there has been a downswing in the World economy, on average about every 8 years or so. In some of these downturns, gold has been countercyclical. That is, the gold price has been price in upturn, and a safe haven in times of trouble. In the current downturn however, gold has trended down as well. So just be a bit circums
  12. I must admit, I have never bought a valuable coin on eBay. I like to examine every valuable coin 'in hand first, before making a decision to buy. Don't get me wrong. eBay is a great place to buy and sell coins, but it is perhaps unwise to buy highly valuable coins (say, over $100) via ebay. That way, you can put an upper limit on your risk. Also OK to buy valuable coins via eBay provided that the seller has the highest of long established professional reputations that is jealously guarded by the seller. That way, perhaps the trust situation is such, that examination 'in hand' may not
  13. There are some pretty darn good fakes out there. To settle all doubts, ring tone test it alongside a known genuine equivalent double eagle. If you haven't got another double eagle agaist which to test it, take it to a good coin dealer who knows his stuff for a good professional opinion. Weight 'OK'? Is there ANY variation at all against the correct weight? The dealer should also be able to point out variations in minor design detail (if any).
  14. As long as the seller on Craiglist is a dealer who has a reputation of the highest order that is jealously guarded by their high level of professionalism, then OK to buy from such a source without examination 'in hand'. 1. Examine the coin alongside a known genuine equvalent, looking for variations in style (if any). If you don't have the confidence to do this yourself, 2. take it to an experienced professional coin dealer for an opinion. 3. Weigh it 4. Have it XRF* tested. Most bullion dealers have a hand held XRF testing instrument. 5. Comparative ring tone testing against a known gen
  15. It seemsto me to be post mint modified by a professional jeweller. There has been occasions where the Perth Mint has produced kilo bullion silver coins with a small diamond embeded. They are made for the Chinese market to commemorate a particular year of the Chionese 12 year cyclical calendar. The diamond goes in the eye socket of the particular animal associated the that year.
×
×
  • Create New...