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captaincoffee

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Everything posted by captaincoffee

  1. There was a bill presented earlier this year to produce commemoratives for a bunch of national parks over the next 15 years: 2007 Devils Tower National Monument 100th 2008 Grand Canyon National Park 100th 2010 Glacier National Park 100th 2011 Lincoln Memorial 100th 2014 Yosemite National Park 150th 2015 Rocky Mountain National Park 100th 2016 National Park Service 100th 2017 Denali National Park 100th 2018 Acadia National Park 100th 2019 Zion National Park 100th 2020 Gettysburg National Military Park 125th Does anyone know if the bill was passed and if these will be produced or not? I've never collected any commemoratives before, but I'm a big National Park lover. Thanks. Dave
  2. Great idea, and would do one myself if I already had the 2001 Buffalo Dollar. I just can't bring myself to pay that much for a commemorative though. The Yellowstone, on the other hand, I may have to go out and buy. I love National Park stuff. Hmmm, maybe another idea for a mini set.
  3. I'm collecting a near-uncirulated example of each just as I would collect an example of any other circulation coin that gets produced during my lifetime. Considering all the time I spend (or waste, if you ask my wife) collecting other coins, it seems hard to imagine not keeping examples of the ones that fall into my lap on a daily basis when I'm on my trips back to the USA.
  4. If your collection is for personal enjoyment only, there is really no reason to get a bill, or coin, graded/slabbed. (unless grading it somehow makes you enjoy it more). If you are into selling stuff (which I am not), you need to do a self-assessment and decide how good you are at grading. Bobby and the other professionals here are probably extremely good. If you can do it accurately enough to make your customers happy and build some trust, that's probably okay for most bills/coins under a certain price. Over a certain price, people will probably want an offical grading unless they are also experts. Although I would sell my car before I sold my 1896 Education Bill, if I did, I would want to get an official grading in order to make sure I got every penny it was worth. Also, if you can tell that the bill/coin is not going to make a high grade anyway, it is probably not worth doing. Sometimes, I see people selling large amounts of inexpensive coins that are graded/slabbed. I can only guess that they have some kind of inside track to get that stuff done at a very low cost. Dave
  5. Where's the fun if you buy a book that has all the answers? I had a similar problem when I first came across this in my collection: I pulled out a book on Arabic script and translated the date, then hit the internet searching for sites with coins from the Middle East. Once I pinged "Egypt" I knew I was in the right area. BTW, I'm just kidding about getting the book. It's a great resource...I'm just too cheap. Dave
  6. Here's the scan of the aforementioned counterfeit coin. It looks a little better in real life than in the scan since I didn't get the color balance quite right. But you can get the idea in terms of detail. If they hadn't screwed up the date, I think it would be pretty difficult to tell. Oh my God! I just realized that this could actually be a previously unknown mintage! It's worth millions! Retirement here I come! Well, maybe not. But I do wonder how many jerks put this stuff up on eBay as genuine. Dave
  7. AAAHHHHH! I just sent you a PM asking if the Lao notes were still available!! I guess I'll just have to bid on them now. TWO DOLLARS. Dave
  8. Since I live in Thailand, I'll provide some input. Smallest currently issued banknote is indeed the 20 baht. The 10 baht is no longer issued, but would still be accepted widely. The largest bill is 1000 baht. There are also 50 (no longer a polymer note), 100, and 500 denominations. The King (Rama IX) is portayed on all of those notes. There are also many commemorative issues that portray other current or past Royalty. My favorite is the large square 60 baht bill that was produced in 1988 for the King's 60th birthday. Dave
  9. On a trip to China 2 weeks ago, I picked up a counterfeit trade dollar at one of the markets. For $2.50 USD I thought it would be good to have it as a reference and maybe fill a hole (temporarilly) until I decide to buy a real one. Other than the weight and the date (it was 1879s-which I don't believe exists) I think it would be difficult to tell if it was real or not. It is worn down just enough to keep you from really seeing if the finer details are accurate or not. I'll scan in a picture for reference if anyone is interested. Dave
  10. I live in Thailand and can confirm that the 50 baht notes are back to the "regular" paper. Sorry that I don't usually scan this part of the forum, or I would have answered your question sooner.
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