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It would also be appreciated if you could show a couple more pictures including the end that would have been impacted to emboss the punch into the paper or other media. I would be interested as to the amount of wear on that end.

On a different subject, this is the 1,000th post of the Swiss Shooting Medals thread of this fine forum. Congratulations to everyone who has participated!    🙂

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Hello,

Thank you for your welcoming and also for the info! Congrats for the 1000th post to this thread!

The amount of wear on the striking end can be seen from the first photo, there is some flattening but not very important, which would imply either a short use on harder materials or longer use on softer ones (like paper). I see that the engraving on this item is done by hand (maybe Schuzengesellschaft was a misspelling?).

Interestingly, the iron body has some peculiar marks on two opposite sides. I think these may either come from forging the body, or from this die being held with a pair of tongs for striking something of harder nature (in the past the upper coin die was held with tongs while it was stricken with a hammer, in order to avoid injury if being directly held by hand).

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Poise said:

Hello,

Thank you for your welcoming and also for the info! Congrats for the 1000th post to this thread!

The amount of wear on the striking end can be seen from the first photo, there is some flattening but not very important, which would imply either a short use on harder materials or longer use on softer ones (like paper). I see that the engraving on this item is done by hand (maybe Schuzengesellschaft was a misspelling?).

Interestingly, the iron body has some peculiar marks on two opposite sides. I think these may either come from forging the body, or from this die being held with a pair of tongs for striking something of harder nature (in the past the upper coin die was held with tongs while it was stricken with a hammer, in order to avoid injury if being directly held by hand).

 

 

 

I would think it was used for paper or leather, very unlikely to be used for metal. Regular dies were used for schützenfest metals. I would also be interested in seeing if they used the umlaut where required. It is unusual that there would be a misspelling especially that word although not unheard of. 

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