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1. Your first medal is M666 (Martin catalog) or Richter 1250 (the new Swiss Shooting medal bible, Richter catalog)

 

Federal Schützenfest of 1890, Frauenfeld, Thurgau

45mm

 

AU - 119 examples

AR - 5760 examples

BR - 4500 examples

WM - 24 examples

 

Engraver: Hugues Bovy, Genf

 

M666, Kr228, Str. 1513-1517

 

This is a comon medal with a market value of $25.00 to $35.00

 

 

 

2. Your second medal is M567 or Richter1167

 

Cantonal Schützenfest of 1891, Ebnat-Kappal, St. Gallen

45mm

 

AU - 1 example

AR - 700 examples

BR - 600 examples

 

Engraver: Hugues Bovy, Genf / J. Stauffacher

 

M567, Kr184, Str. 1314-1316

 

The market value for this medal is $40.00 to $60.00

 

 

 

3. Your third medal is a common German shooting medal with market value between $15.00 to $25.00

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1855_Solothurn.jpg

 

I needed this piece for my type collection of circulation coins, because this

shooting medal from Solothurn (3000 pieces struck) has a very similar design

compared to the contemporary circulation coin:

 

1850_5FR_scan.jpg

 

The rim of the Solothurn Schützentaler shows an inset lettering:

Eidgen. Freischiesen * Solothurn 1855 *

The rim of the circulation coin is corrugated.

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I am loving this thread. The quality of engraving on these medals is wonderful.

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I am loving this thread. The quality of engraving on these medals is wonderful.

 

Ditto on loving this thread. In fact this is how I found this forum.

 

Here is one of my Swiss Shooting Medals, a 1910 from Bern.

 

1910bern.jpg

 

I have several others and will post photos or scans as time permits.

I own the 1892 Glarus and the 1895 Zurich that Ian posted, about the same quality too, suggesting we both bought from the same excellent Swiss seller from Winterthur.

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Ditto on loving this thread. In fact this is how I found this forum.

 

Here is one of my Swiss Shooting Medals, a 1910 from Bern.

 

1910bern.jpg

 

I have several others and will post photos or scans as time permits.

I own the 1892 Glarus and the 1895 Zurich that Ian posted, about the same quality too, suggesting we both bought from the same excellent Swiss seller from Winterthur.

 

Glad to see you found this thread. I saw you mention schuetzenmedals (or whatever they're called) in another thread somewhere and I instantly thought of a few collectors here that specialize in them.

 

Of course make sure you venture out into other threads!

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Thanks, I fully intend to explore this forum from top to bottom. I REALLY like this place and the people here...

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Another 1910 Bern, toned and in near perfect condition.

 

1910Bern-1.jpg

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And a 1904 Zurich, Richter #1789a, 27mm with 1000 struck in silver. And a beautiful design from Huguenin.

There is also a silver plated brass version of this that I would love to stumble across one day.

 

1904Zurcher.jpg

 

Best helmet ever...

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And a 1901 Luzern:

 

1901Luzern.jpg

 

A nice big (45mm) piece of Swiss silver, and with 7000 struck, you won't spend a lifetime finding one.

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Everyone has posted some very nice medals. I am very happy to see that schützenfest medals have been gaining interest in the community :ninja: . If anyone has any questions or if I can help in any way please do not hesitate in asking. I've been collecting schützenfest medals for over twenty years and my Father has been collecting them for over forty.

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As I get more into the Swiss Shooting Medals I find I am drawn to the engraver Holy Freres. His/Her/Their work is outstanding.

 

Was Holy Freres a man, woman, or group of friars as the name implies? Google has nothing.

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Everyone has posted some very nice medals. I am very happy to see that schützenfest medals have been gaining interest in the community :ninja: . If anyone has any questions or if I can help in any way please do not hesitate in asking. I've been collecting schützenfest medals for over twenty years and my Father has been collecting them for over forty.

 

I hope you will be able to help me.

 

Many years ago, I bought a small group of shooting medals.

 

A scan of one of them is shown below. I do not own a copy of Martin or any later works, so my remarks below are taken from my old notes about this piece.

 

The medal is from Bern (Langenthal) 1899. It is silver and apparently of the type of Martin-151. The bear is as shown in Martin, but the other side is not. The Swiss Miss has her hair braided differently and the names of both Munger and Homberg appear in the field (while only Homberg appears on the Martin piece) and it does not have "Bern" on it like the Martin illustration does.

 

I will be grateful for any information you might be able to offer. Thanks!

bernqf6.jpg

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I hope you will be able to help me.

 

Many years ago, I bought a small group of shooting medals.

 

A scan of one of them is shown below. I do not own a copy of Martin or any later works, so my remarks below are taken from my old notes about this piece.

 

The medal is from Bern (Langenthal) 1899. It is silver and apparently of the type of Martin-151. The bear is as shown in Martin, but the other side is not. The Swiss Miss has her hair braided differently and the names of both Munger and Homberg appear in the field (while only Homberg appears on the Martin piece) and it does not have "Bern" on it like the Martin illustration does.

 

I will be grateful for any information you might be able to offer. Thanks!

bernqf6.jpg

 

Hello,

 

Your medal is R239b (M151 variation). In the Martin book, Martin pictures the rare M151

R239c that only 5 examples were minted and in my 25 years and my Father's 40+ years of collecting, we have never seen that particular example. In the new Schützenfest Medals 'bible' by Jürg Richter the medals are identified as R239b (your's) and R239c.

 

R239b: 850 examples, 30mm and is relatively common in terms of shooting medals and has a market value of $40-120 dollars depending on condition.

 

The Martin example shown in Martin is the one that only 5 examples are known and is thought to be a proof strike but my Father and I have never seen so that can't be substantiated. Many shooting medals have proof-like surfaces but proof dies (as we know them today) were not normally used. Although there are many shooting medals that can rival today's proofs.

 

Variations of shooting medals are somewhat common. There are of course the same medal in different metals and there are at times variations of a medal in the same metal, such as the M151 (R239), sometimes even 4 variations and these usually in the silver examples.

 

I hope this helps with your question.

 

Rod

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Hello,

 

Your medal is R239b (M151 variation). In the Martin book, Martin pictures the rare M151

9R239c that only 5 examples were minted and in my 25 years and my Father's 40+ years of collecting, we have never seen that particular example. In the new Schützenfest Medals 'bible' by Jürg Richter the medal are identified as R239b (your's) and R239c.

 

R239b: 850 examples, 30mm and is relatively common in terms of shooting medals and has a market value of $40-120 dollars depending on condition.

 

The Martin example shown in Martin is the one that only 5 examples are known and is thought to be a proof strike but my Father and I have never seen so that can't be substantiated. Many shooting medals have proof-like surfaces but proof dies (as we know them today) were not normally used. Although there are many shooting medals that can rival today's proofs.

 

Variations of shooting medals are somewhat common. There are of course the same medal in different metals and there are at times variations of a medal in the same metal, such as the M151 (R239), sometimes even 4 variations and these usually in the silver examples.

 

I hope this helps with your question.

 

Rod

 

It does, thank you.

 

This medal, and the others were purchased when I was not really fully settled on my collecting direction, buying lots of different things that appealed to me, but without any coherent sense of collecting pattern.

 

I thought this might be a rare variety or even a pattern. I am somewhat disappointed to learn otherwise but I thank you for correcting my misunderstanding of the situation. :ninja:

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Nice medal nevertheless.

 

No one here knows anything about Holy Freres? :ninja:

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hiho,

 

I am not positive but I bellieve Holy Freres was a prolific Swiss engraver, male.

Information from obtained from Forrer:

 

Holy Freres (i.e. "Holy Brothers") was a firm which was established in 1893 at St. Imier in Switzerland. The brothers, Franz Holy & Jules Holy directed it. They were watch-case manufacturers & diesinkers.

 

They eventually branched out into medal making. Forrer lists a number of medals and it appears the firm was most active in medal making from 1903-1911 (some medals are undated and might have been produced later).

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Information from obtained from Forrer:

 

Holy Freres (i.e. "Holy Brothers") was a firm which was established in 1893 at St. Imier in Switzerland. The brothers, Franz Holy & Jules Holy directed it. They were watch-case manufacturers & diesinkers.

 

They eventually branched out into medal making. Forrer lists a number of medals and it appears the firm was most active in medal making from 1903-1911 (some medals are undated and might have been produced later).

 

This makes perfect sense, as I have seen watches engraved by Holy Freres in addition to their shooting medals.

Thank you grivna1726 and schutzenfester for this info. I was absolutely clueless...

 

If anyone here has any Holy Freres medals that they wish to sell or trade away, please click on the down arrow to the right of hiho and then click on SEND MESSAGE. I definitely prefer uncleaned examples, but I'll keep an open mind if it's something I need.

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Here's a new Swiss Shooting Medal I recently picked up, a 1906 Nyon........

 

1906-Nyon.jpg

 

Only 400 of these were struck.

Anyone want to try and guess how NGC graded it? :ninja:

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Here's a new Swiss Shooting Medal I recently picked up, a 1906 Nyon........

 

1906-Nyon.jpg

 

Only 400 of these were struck.

Anyone want to try and guess how NGC graded it? ;)

Who is the engraver?

 

I looked at the signature behind the woman but am having trouble making it out (A Jacob Guillamuad?).

 

Lovely medal! :ninja:

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My 1965 Krause "Swiss Shooting Talers And Medals" lists the engraver as Jacob Guillarmod.

 

I love the woman's flying saucer hat... :ninja:

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My 1965 Krause "Swiss Shooting Talers And Medals" lists the engraver as Jacob Guillarmod.

"Jacob Guillarmod" is not listed in Forrer (at least not that I can find). ;)

 

I love the woman's flying saucer hat... :ninja:

The Vaud fish on her chest is a nice touch as well (the one that didn't get away!) ;)

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"Jacob Guillarmod" is not listed in Forrer (at least not that I can find). ;)

The Vaud fish on her chest is a nice touch as well (the one that didn't get away!) ;)

 

Next chance I get I'll take out my loupe and try and get the correct spelling of Jacob G's name.

 

The fish was extremely well placed, at least from a design perspective... :ninja:

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hiho,

 

As you know, you have a 1906 Vaud, Nyon Cantonal Schützenfest medal with a mintage of 400 pieces. It is 33 mm in size and is silver. Silver was the only metal this particualr medal was made in.

 

It is R1610 (Richter) and M964 (Martin)

 

The engraver is Alfred Jacot-Guillarmond of Le Locle

 

It's value would range (conditon range of EF to Pristine UNC) from approx. $70 - $150.00

 

You have a nice example of this schützenfest medal.

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