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talesweaver

old coins, worht? and should i clean it

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Hello, i have signed up here to know the value of these 3 coins that i have,
it is in bad shape, because i have just found these coins recently last year in my dad's atache case, he told me i can have it, since its in bad shape do i have to clean it up? or does cleaning lower its value?
i live in the philippines by the way so access to any coin appraisal is very limitied

 

i have placed the images on this imgur site if anyone here needs to see it

front side : http://imgur.com/YQEp5Pr

back side : http://imgur.com/pjfJMgl

 

thank you

 

 

main topic typo, sorry, its written "worth"

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Hello and welcome!

 

The piece on the left is a fantasy / counterfeit piece.

 

The middle and one on the right would require further evaluation as to whether or not they're genuine, but both types generally speaking are quite common.

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Hi I'm new here. I have some coins that I inherited from my mom. all canadian. i did some quick research on the net and some are "proof-like" uncirculated sets (6-coins, different demonimations, sealed in those celophane wraps). In the same bag in which she kept these coins, there are also 11 LOOSE $1 silver coins (not wrapped in anything protective except an old fabric pencil case in which my mom kept the coins). but because these coins were not in a "special protective wrap" like the sets, the silver is darkened and discolored. while doing my quick search I saw that there are a few different kinds of these 1966 silver dollar coins (small, medium and large beaded) and depending on the type of beading, some of them can be worth quite a lot, even if they are circulated...(I have no idea how accurate is the website I found the info) anyhow, I am wondering, should I try to get some of the dirt off with a regular silver/jewellery cleaner/polisher?
concerning some of the others, I saw on some sites they ask for authentication for the coins when selling them. is this truly necessary when they are sealed canada mint sets and if yes- where does one get such certs and what is the cost? Also where is the best place you can sell coins without getting ripped off? Thanks

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Hi I'm new here. I have some coins that I inherited from my mom. all canadian. i did some quick research on the net and some are "proof-like" uncirculated sets (6-coins, different demonimations, sealed in those celophane wraps). In the same bag in which she kept these coins, there are also 11 LOOSE $1 silver coins (not wrapped in anything protective except an old fabric pencil case in which my mom kept the coins). but because these coins were not in a "special protective wrap" like the sets, the silver is darkened and discolored. while doing my quick search I saw that there are a few different kinds of these 1966 silver dollar coins (small, medium and large beaded) and depending on the type of beading, some of them can be worth quite a lot, even if they are circulated...(I have no idea how accurate is the website I found the info) anyhow, I am wondering, should I try to get some of the dirt off with a regular silver/jewellery cleaner/polisher?

concerning some of the others, I saw on some sites they ask for authentication for the coins when selling them. is this truly necessary when they are sealed canada mint sets and if yes- where does one get such certs and what is the cost? Also where is the best place you can sell coins without getting ripped off? Thanks

 

Hi!

 

As a general rule of thumb, I don't recommend cleaning anything, unless it's a common item with little/no collectible value, in which case it doesn't really matter.

 

Earlier prooflike sets from the 1950s into the early 1960s some in cardboard holders with a really brittle plastic wrap.

These should always be left intact as they are collectible as such.

 

Later sets should also be kept intact, but there's not too much market demand for these sets.

Those from c. 1963-67 are generally traded for close to the value of the silver in the coins.

Those from c. 1968-69 are traded for very close to face value

Sets from the 1970s onwards vary. Most sets are relatively common and many 1970s and 1980s sets retail in the $5-10 range.

 

Certification is generally not necessary on common / average material.

 

There are some variations on 1965 and 1966 silver dollars, but frankly speaking, it's like lotto tickets - most are going to be "not a winner" so to say. That being said, if you really have the time to learn the varieties and check yours out, by all means, you should do so just to find out for sure. But most dealers don't generally look for them (rare varieties).

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