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harpagon coins

Do you consider this Italian 1 lira from 1926a coin?

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Hi there!

 

I have two Italian 1 lira coins from 1926. There were only 500 minted. A few weeks ago a fellow collector took an interest in them, but then brushed off the idea of buying one by stating that it was not legal tender and that it had been minted specifically for collectors.

 

This does not seem to be the case from my understanding, even though they were minted for collectors, they were still legal tender - if a collector would have wanted to use it as such. Many mints produce coins and dispatch them directly to collector lists while still remaining legal tender. In his statement, he appeared to be saying that this was not a real coin for him. The only thing I can fathom is that he, like me actually, does not like to buy mint sets, or coins sold by the mints for collectors. In some way, he does not feel it is a real coin since it never entered circulation or even was intended for circulation. A kind of vanity coin collecting, when a coin is released directly to collectors without any intention of its public use.

 

Would it be fair to say that he felt this is not a real coin? – in his definition.

 

I personally feel the same way with contemporary mint sets, however, at a mint run of 500 I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss them.

 

Please share your opinion on this matter.

 

Buono1liraFF.jpgBuono1liraBB.jpg

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While I don't know the history of that mintage, I have to agree with you - it's legal tender.

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NCLT and NCLT-like pieces (regular circulation coins of exceptionally low mintage, especially when compared to other dates of the same type) are always a sensitive topic. To each their own.

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It is most definitely a coin worthy of collecting. The most recent two examples on Heritage Auctions sold for around $500. One of Romagnoli's many beautiful designs. :)

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In France and in Italy post WWI the currencies were devalued and silver francs and lire disappeared from circulation. In response both countries minted what they hoped would be token issues and that the original value would be restored. In reality the buon pour and bouno da tokens ended up being effectively used as coins as silver was not restored to the lower denominations. So they were hoped to be used as temporary tokens but ended up being used as coins.

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Please share your opinion on this matter.

 

 

 

Sure: It is a coin, and it is collectable.

 

I already have one of that batch and do not "need" another or I would be interested since I live in Italia much of the year and collect Italian items.

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