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Wikipedia's Featured Article of the Day

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I've posted about these before but surprisingly often, a coin or note makes the Featured Article of the Day on Wikipedia! This happens so often that I actually have stopped posting about it but I think I need to. Numismatic topics are way more prevalent than other hobbies - take that philatelia!

 

Featured Article on January 25th, 2014 - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elgin,_Illinois,_Centennial_half_dollar

 

Does anyone have one of these?

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Nice article George. I like the coin but don't have one in my collection.

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Another Article of the Day!

 

This time - the Kennedy Half Dollar

 

What I learned from the article - that they haven't been struck for circulation for a while now. I'm not a fan of the mint producing coins (besides proofs and commemoratives) that don't circulate. What would it take to make them circulate?

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Another Article of the Day!

 

This time - the Kennedy Half Dollar

 

What I learned from the article - that they haven't been struck for circulation for a while now. I'm not a fan of the mint producing coins (besides proofs and commemoratives) that don't circulate. What would it take to make them circulate?

 

People actually using them like they did (more or less) in the 70s. I once stopped at Tim Hortons and paid for my caffeine with a Sacagawea and a half dollar. The girl at the window genuinely asked me if the Kennedy piece was a two dollar coin. >.<

 

(for the record: while I was sore tempted, I was honest and said it wasn't)

 

When I can get my hands on rolls of halves (almost impossible anymore from the banks), I spend what isn't silver and/or doesn't fill holes in my collection. And I almost invariably get funny looks -- especially since no one can figure out what slot in the drawer it should go into since they have five slots anymore: penny, nickel, dime, quarter, and dollar. Older (i.e., my age) folks will often smile and comment that they haven't seen a half dollar in ages/a long time/do they still make those?

 

You oughta see what happens when I get my hand on a few $2 bills. :D

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Nice article. It's well done. I have a terrible time getting half anymore. The last time I ordered them at the one bank that will do so, they "never" came in. I'm thinking the lady didn't want to order them but didn't want to say so. It's rather a pain since you have to order $2500 worth at a time. Maybe I'll try again before the year is out.

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Again?! I swear, coins are one of the most common Featured Articles of the Day. Maybe it's because we collectors are so attentive to detail and design.

 

For April 22, 2014: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-cent_piece

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Again?! I swear, coins are one of the most common Featured Articles of the Day. Maybe it's because we collectors are so attentive to detail and design.

 

For April 22, 2014: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-cent_piece

 

Nice article. The two cent pieces always had great fascination for me when I was a kid. Now for some reason I don't collect them.

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Aaaaaand another:

 

Stone Mountain Memorial half dollar - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_Mountain_Memorial_half_dollar

 

That coin is the first commemorative I ever had. My father's father had several in his collection and my father inherited them before giving them to me. So I consider them very special even if they are one of the more common classic commemoratives.

Does anyone out there have Stone Mountain halves, too?

 

Has anyone been to Stone Mountain? I have... in 1996 before the Atlanta Olympics, I believe. I saw a laser light show there with my cousins.

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I've got a stone half. It's one of the few of the era that's affordable.

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I like the Stone Mountain Half. I can still recall purchasing my first one at a coin show in Marietta, GA shortly after we moved there in 1974. If you think they're affordable now, you should have seen them then. Nice write-up. Stone Mountain Park is a wonderful place to visit. I encourage anyone who gets the chance to spend a day there.

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There must be some coin collectors leading Wikipedia. Once again!

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-cent_nickel

 

I've got a couple of these. The series seems to be well known for die clashes. I wonder why...

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Must be a QC issue. Let's ask an engineer :-)

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Here we go again! This time the Seated Liberty dollar - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seated_Liberty_dollar

 

I'd love to have one of those. Do any of you have one?

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Do not have one but I've never really felt a great attraction to them.

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I love the Seated Lib design, and I'd love to add one to my hoard.

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Look what we have here, another coin (this time a set) as Wikipedia's featured article of the day - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama–Pacific_commemorative_coins

 

The commemorative coins of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition!

 

Unlike many of the other articles (and there are many!), I'm confident no one in this forum has one of the $50 coins. Well, surprise me if you do!

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Nice article. Nice coins too.

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Would be nice to have one that's for sure.

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Not exactly a coin but definitely coin related: Mary Margaret O'Reilly - Assistant Director of the Mint during the 1910s, 1920s, and 1930s. She oversaw one of the golden eras of coinage with Buffalo Nickels, Mercury Dimes, and, my favorite, the Peace Dollar.

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