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World transitional coinage

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I personally find transitional coinage to be quite interesting. Why?

 

Before I start, I think I might need to define what transitional coinage is as some people might have different ideas of what it is.

 

I would define a transitional coinage as two different types of coins issued in the same year. Why this is interesting is because rather than waiting for the next design to be issued the next year, some urgent event may have prompted the need for the new coinage to appear faster than required. Some reasons are high metal prices, change of monarchy, inflation and so on. A good example is the 1982 penny where the composition was changed from copper to plated zinc in the same year rather than waiting it out to the next year.

 

Here are some examples that I have:

 

South Korea:

 

1970 5 and 10 won:

 

Red copper

908189.jpg

 

Yellow copper

908190.jpg

 

During the late 1960s, copper prices have shot drastically that the Korean mint was forced to reconsider the amount of copper that was used in their coinage. 1 won was soon switched from 60% Cu, 40% Zn to 100% in 1968. As if this wasn't enough, an urgent change was done in 1970 where copper content was dropped from 88% to 65%. You can tell that the color of coins are different.

 

This problem has reoccured later in 2006 where copper zinc coin still proved to be too expensive and it was replaced with copper plated aluminum coin.

 

954159.jpg

 

954160.jpg

 

Malaysia

 

In 1993, Malaysia decided to remove the dollar sign from the ringgit coin and replace it with the word "ringgit".

 

1021179.jpg

 

984090.jpg

 

This caused a lot of confusion with the public as they believed the latter version is a counterfeited. Confusion coupled with circulating counterfeited ringgit coins would eventually make this coin demonitized in 2005.

 

China - Manchukuo

 

There's more examples of this but I decided to show just a couple.

 

In 1934, the reign has changed from Da Tong to Kang De

 

998226.jpg

 

984606.jpg

 

Critical shortage of war metals have caused copper, nickel and even aluminum to be systemically removed from circulation.

 

1944 Aluminum 5 fen

990309.jpg

 

1944 Red fiber 5 fen

994752.jpg

 

Would like to see what else you know or have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I find this very interesting. It's an area of collecting that I had not paid much attention to. Even the humble US Cent got involved as you pointed out. I'll be watching this thread to see what else I can learn. Thanks.

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Neat! I had considered this as a theme just last week, when I had a 1978 Eisenhower $1 and a 1979 SBA $1 beside each other on my desk - but same year changes definitely brings it to a new level.

 

For the US, the 1942 nickel and silver-alloy 5c would be another 20th c. example (and in the 19th c., there's several more)

 

For Canada, some 20th c. circulation examples would include

1920 large/small cent

1942 5c nickel/brass

1968 10c & 25c silver/nickel

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Neat! I had considered this as a theme just last week, when I had a 1978 Eisenhower $1 and a 1979 SBA $1 beside each other on my desk - but same year changes definitely brings it to a new level.

 

For the US, the 1942 nickel and silver-alloy 5c would be another 20th c. example (and in the 19th c., there's several more)

 

For Canada, some 20th c. circulation examples would include

1920 large/small cent

1942 5c nickel/brass

1968 10c & 25c silver/nickel

 

also in 1968 was also Switzerland with the 1/2 Franc, 1, 2, and 5 Franc

went from Silver to Copper-Nickel

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Just what I need, another category to collect! This is a really clever angle, thanks for suggesting it.

 

Huh. I'm trying to think if there's been a more recent instance in US coinage than 1942. I suppose the 1982 change from bronze to copper-washed zinc in pennies was it, but that's not immediately evident to the eye.

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also in 1968 was also Switzerland with the 1/2 Franc, 1, 2, and 5 Franc

went from Silver to Copper-Nickel

 

Yes, but it was a more standard type of changeover where one type (silver '67) was issued in one year and the metal change was for the following year (c/n '68).

 

Something that is odd about Swiss coins is how the 5Sfr in 1969 is silver again as a one-off.

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This is something kind of never heard-of. It’s a good way to tell us how these transitional pairs have come to exist and made the coinage history pricey. I guess they must be extremely expensive due to their rarity, even though I would like to own at least one complete set of a kind.

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Didn't realize there are two types of 1942 nickels!

 

me niether :crazy:

 

Shame, shame, shame. (As Gomer would say :grin: )

 

You can read more about it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_nickel

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well, "Shazam", very interesring, I didn't even know about the recut of the steps :bsad:

I think you're referring to the 1939 issues? Yeah, as if the 39D isn't going to hurt bad enough for my Jefferson Project... anyway, I find it hard to see, m'self, even in a loupe--mostly I just have to hope the dealer labeled them right when they're marked "Reverse of '38" and "Reverse of '40".

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Got 2 2003 Canadian Pennies today

 

with diff portraits of the Queen

 

the big diff. is the contents of each coin

 

Coin 1 - Copper Plated Zinc

Coin 2 - Copper Plated Steel

 

anyone know what part of the year they made the change over

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From 1999 onwards there were a number of years where both types (zinc and steel) were made concurrently.

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