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One of the key areas for jeton collecting is the French Assurance industry. This subject area is covered in `Numismatique de L'Assurance' by Raymond Gaihouste through his fairly comprehensive cataloguing of the jetons, medalets and medals produced through the ages for the various assurance financiers/ syndicates/ and latterly companies specifically covering the various insurable `risks'. Some of the pieces are miniature works of art in their own right and very scarce indeed in terms of their relatively low mintages and their ttrition through the years. I've previously posted individual jetons from various companies I have in my collection, mainly those issued by different maritime assurers. However, there are many jetons issued by the various general assurance companies. That is, those covering `life', agriculture (animal health, crop failures etc), buildings + contents (fire risk etc), transport, business failure, war, etc etc etc. A fascinating subject area that gives insight into the world of commerce and finance as well as the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune (or misfortune as the case may be). it also provides fascinating insight as to the rise and fall of various bodies (sometimes disappearing without trace), mergers, acquisitions, and business failures. Hopefully other collectors will post examples of jetons they have in this field

 

I've just acquired this particular jeton, an octagonal piece struck at the Paris mint for `Le Palladium', a french assurer covering the risk from fire. Typically these `jetons de presence' were issued to board members as a recognition and recompense for their participation at board meetings and the annual assembly. Some companies issued different jetons throughout their history. In the case of `Le palladium' this is the sole jeton type struck for them.

 

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Very nice. :bthumbsup: Why only one jeton for that company? Did they go out of business?

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I've turned to stone!

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I've turned to stone!

:)

 

I meant to say ...`whatever you do don't look at the shield!'

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Very nice. :bthumbsup: Why only one jeton for that company? Did they go out of business?

 

Hi Art,

 

I've since done a little bit more research and discovered that the jeton i've acquired is in fact a variant on the original jeton issued, which has different wording on the reverse (but the same time frame). There is another jeton with the bust of Louis Philippe obverse and the same reverse as the one i have, which now leaves me wondering whether the one I have is an error ( `mule' of the two types) or a deliberate issue. I suspect the latter however. Gailhouste has published a newer version of his catalogue than the one I have on hand, so until I scrape the pennies together to update my library i'm a wee bit hamstrung for further data.

 

The company itself was founded in 1841. According to Gailhouste, the company ceased its operations in 1854 and its portfolio was taken over by `Le Soleil' (The Sun)

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Here's a couple I took to be long service medals given the 1817-1847 and 1877-1908 inscriptions.

 

Bob

Project 3.jpg

Project 2.jpg

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This is a high grade example of a jeton issued by the `Syndic des Tontines', one of France's (and the world's) first life assurers. I will leave you to research what a `Tontine' is but suffice it to say it was the forerunner to modern day principles in life assurance.

 

The syndicate concerned existed between 1700 -1770. Although none of its jetons were dated, the date of each issue is broadly determinable by the style of bust of the king. This one is the last type to be issued circa 1760-70)

1004412.jpg

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Great bird!

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I only discovered the existence of this particular jeton a month or so ago.

Issued during the time of Napoleon III for Le Triton, a maritime assurer circa 1860.

 

This jeton is unusual as it is very 3 dimensional in terms of the bust of Nap III. Unfortunately it also appears to have been harshly cleaned by someone with aversion to toning, so sun glasses are a requirement for viewing. Ah well rarity never comes cheap unless there is a downside....... :(

 

1017610.jpg

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Rare is beautiful (although it really has been scrubbed, hasn't it?).

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Looks to me like someone has used a mechanical device for cleaning this item. Actually, that is an understatement. Possibly either sandpaper or steel wool has been used. You couldn't get the surfaces much courser short of taking a bl**dy chisel to it!

 

Upshot is that It's still the best example of this jeton that i've seen to date, and it was (relatively) cheap......but no prize to the previous owner for their conservation skills. They must have been given a Dremel for Christmas and thinks that the only good coin is a shiny one.

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Cleaned or not I think it's a beauty. Great addition to anyone's collection.

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This one is a more modern (circa 1914) medal issued by La Populaire. It appears to be the only piece they ever issued. This example appears to be some sort of service recognition for the individual named on the reverse.

 

1017608.jpg

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Jeton de Presence for `La Flotte' a French maritime assurer which came into existence in 1861 and which is no longer in existence

 

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Strange that in more than a decade and a half of scouring auction catalogues and the various ebay sites I had never even come across one. Supposedly as scarce as hen's teeth for a relatively modern jeton, yet within a month of my coming across it in Gailhouste's 1993 book on the subject two appear on ebay. I bought one of them and since then another has appeared. Reminds me of the old addage re the old Heinz tomato ketchup `when at first you shake the bottle, none will come and then a lot'l.' I'mm happy though.

 

I've had a good run of luck with obtaining some reatively scarce pieces in this field this past month and will probably bore you senseless with their images when i get the chance to scan them all.

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Jeton de Presence for `La Flotte' a French maritime assurer which came into existence in 1861 and which is no longer in existence

 

1022280.jpg

 

Strange that in more than a decade and a half of scouring auction catalogues and the various ebay sites I had never even come across one. Supposedly as scarce as hen's teeth for a relatively modern jeton, yet within a month of my coming across it in Gailhouste's 1993 book on the subject two appear on ebay. I bought one of them and since then another has appeared. Reminds me of the old addage re the old Heinz tomato ketchup `when at first you shake the bottle, none will come and then a lot'l.' I'mm happy though.

 

I've had a good run of luck with obtaining some reatively scarce pieces in this field this past month and will probably bore you senseless with their images when i get the chance to scan them all.

 

 

That's a great looking jeton Ian.

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Wow, nice find, Ian. Do you have a more exact idea of numbers?

No hard facts available whatsoever, but the number originally struck is likely to be less than 1,000, and we do know that some were struck in bronze (have never seen a bronze example yet). I suspect that the number of surviving examples will be quite low.

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ditto what constanius said.

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Here are a few recent acquisitions in relation to the `maritime' field of assurance companies

 

The first is `L'Industrie Francaise', It is undated and there is no record as to the date of its emission and (untypically) there are no edge markings. The only thing known is that the engraver (Massonnet) worked his arts between 1856 and 1905. This jeton is likely to be circa 1860. Interestingly the image Gailhouste portrays in his 1993 catalogue has the figure facinf=g left. the only examples i have seen, the figure faces right.

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The next is a relatively `blandly' designed jeton issued for the `Union Maritime' an assurer set up in 1847 during the reign of Louis Phillipe. This jeton was the only one issued for this company, which no longer exisists. It was struck in both silver and tin. this example being silver.

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Next is a nice example of a scarcer jeton issued for the `Comite des Assureurs Maritime (Paris)' which was issued between 1845 and 1880. There are two different designs for the obverse, the most notable difference being the design of the ship in the middle distance. On this example the ship is an ancient galley, the other being a galleon type design. This example was struck circa 1845.

1022334.jpg

 

Next is a jeton struck for `Lloyd Rouenaise'. This one, although dated 1866 on reverse and also 1877 (small date in exergue obverse) was actually struck at some point after 1880. The design is the same as the one first issued in 1866 which had a `bee' as an edge marking, depicting its date of issue as 1860-1880. This example has the cornucopia edge marking depicting post 1880.

1022338.jpg

 

Lastly (for now) is the `Union Des Ports', a french maritime assurer founded in 1832. This jeton was struck in both silver and bronze and was issued between 1832 and 1880. It can be found with three different edge markings 1) a very small incuse Alladin's lamp (1832-41), 2) a hand with the index finger pointing to the right (1845-60) and a bee (1860-80). This example is 1845-60, although i now have examples of all three.

1022372.jpg

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All very nice Ian. As to the one with the reversed obverse is it possible that the picture in the book was just misprinted, there is no inscription to help judge if there are 2 opposite versions or it is just an illustration error. You have the jeton and the book, perhaps a closer comparison will be of help. Occam's razor points to an illustration error.

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Yes. probability is extremely high that it is merely a printing error. I've now seen at least three examples like mine but not a single example as it appears in the book. Maybe the printer had too much wine that day. :)

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