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almingbg

Banknotes from Fiume 1921

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Hi everyone

 

Here come several banknotes from the city of Fiume, today Rijeka, Croatia. Banknotes are rather scarce, you don't see them every day.

 

Fiume PS101a 1 krona 1916 - circular stamp Citta di Fiume

 

935857A.jpg

 

similar banknote:

 

935856A.jpg

 

Next one is Fiume PS108c 10 kronen 1915 (1921) - circular stam Citta di Fiume on the obverse, and rectangular stamp Instituto di Credito Consiglio Nazionale on the reverse

 

935858A.jpg

935858B.jpg

 

And the last one is Fiume PS112d 50 kronen 1914 (1921), with both stamps on the obverse:

 

935855A.jpg

 

bye

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Nice notes! We dont' get to see them too often. It's good to see the types of overstamps on them. Is there a reason that some of them have the second square overstamp along with the circular one? Or do the top notes have the square stamps on their reverse?

 

Congrats on getting these - cool notes to have. :bthumbsup:

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Interesting. Did they have their own note issues, or only temp / emergency issue overstamped Austrian notes?

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Interesting. Did they have their own note issues, or only temp / emergency issue overstamped Austrian notes?

 

 

Hi ccg

There are some other banknotes, from mid 1800 and post WW1, but they are some kind of emergency issues too. More details can be found in a catalogue by Borna Barac: Paper money from the states of the former Yugoslavia

 

More info about city of Fiume / Rijeka can be found on wikipedia: Free State of Fiume, and even some info about Fiume krone (very basic and incomplete).

 

There are some other resources about Fiume kroner, but they are in Croatian:

Papirni novac - Fiume - D'Annunzio (Paper money - Fiume - D'Annunzio)

Krune "CITTA DI FIUME" i problem valute u Rijeci od godine 1918-1924. (Kroner "Citta di Fiume" and monetary problem in Rijeka in years 1918-1924)

 

best regards

Almin

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Nice notes! We dont' get to see them too often. It's good to see the types of overstamps on them. Is there a reason that some of them have the second square overstamp along with the circular one? Or do the top notes have the square stamps on their reverse?

 

Congrats on getting these - cool notes to have. :bthumbsup:

 

Thanx dave

 

Yes, there is a reason for two overstamps.

Actually, there are three different overstamps - the third one is knows as Savoy or SABAUDO coat of arms, used by Italian army. Banknotes with this overstamp are extremely rare (unfortunately, not my collection):

 

103ehzb.jpg

35c3cyr.jpg

 

Right after WW1 (september 1919) Italian troops, led by D'Annunzio, marched in Fiume and annexed the city to Italy. They accepted Austro-Hungarian monetary system and every banknote that circulated in the area was overstamped.

 

The first type of stamp was SABAUDO stamp. Together with it, the second type was introduced - the oval stamp CITTA DI FIUME. This one was in use for only a couple of weeks, because of heavy counterfeits. In the beginning oh November 1919. the third stamp was introduced - rectangular stamp INSTITUTO DI CREDITO - CONSIGLIO NAZIONALE - CITTA DI FIUME. Only the higher value banknotes (10-1000 kroner) with type II stamp were overstamped with the third stamp.

 

Papirni novac - Fiume - D'Annunzio (Paper money - Fiume - D'Annunzio) page shows all overstamped banknotes with values in € for fine, VF and XF.

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Interesting. So do I get it right that the overstamp made the note "legal" currency in the newly acquired area?

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Yes, that's right.

And to prohibit the use of the same but not overstamped banknotes from other countries.

 

Do you know what conditions existed that allowed stamping of some notes? Was it a tax thing or a valid "papers" thing or ?

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Do you know what conditions existed that allowed stamping of some notes? Was it a tax thing or a valid "papers" thing or ?

 

I'm not sure that I understand your question. I'll try to describe the political and monetary situation in that region.

 

WW1 ended in December 1918, and one of results was the crash of the Austro-Hungarian empire and the creation of several new countries: Czech republic, Hungaria, Kingdom of Yugoslavia, (maybe, I'm not sure) Romania, Fiume (as a free city)... Austro-Hungarian money soon started to loose it's value, and those new countries decided to "mark" or "validate" A-U kroner found on their territories, to prevent circulation of fresh printed (and worthless) A-U kroner.

 

You can try to put this document into Google translate (Croatian->English), the result is actually quite good (one thing: Rijeka means river, but I don't think that there's any river in the city of Rijeka :grin: )

 

best regards

Almin

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Interesting. Thanks for the info. So it was currency control to prevent the influx of deflated currencies into their local economy.

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There exist many forgeries of the round stamps (not of the rectangular overprint). They are found on uncirculated and on used notes as well. I was told they are/were mainly produced in Croatia.

 

Erwin

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Just a little remark. Italian poet Gabriele D'Annunzio didn't led Italian troops (I mean, it wasn't Italian Army) but a group of volunteers, that were driven away from Fiume from Italian Army itself, since he refused an Italian-Yugoslavian agreement. After that, a new agreement made Fiume an Italian city, until Yugoslavian victory (1945).

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The overstamps were more like validation for the note. I have some similar notes from Bukovina, which was previously part of Austro-Hungarian Empire but then was claimed by Romania, Ukraine People's Republic and then USSR when USSR took the region in early 1920's.

 

I have to wonder how many times that the validation stamps were forged though, very easy to do.

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hi every one

 

after seeing of this topic I have check my mess of old things at home and I found this one banknote. What do you think about that?

savoy_forum.jpg

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Hello and welcome to CoinPeople. Quite a nice note you've found there. :bthumbsup:

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thank you. Primary I collect orders and medals but I like old things so I have also militaria, old books, etc. and of course also some coins and banknotes :yes:

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