Jump to content
CoinPeople.com
Sign in to follow this  
Art

PCI2010 Group 10C.2 Voting

PCI2010 Group 10C.2 Voting  

19 members have voted

  1. 1. Pick your favorite

    • Robert of Anjou Gigliato
      6
    • Scottish Coronation Medal by Nicholas Briot
      13


Recommended Posts

YeOldeCollector's Robert of Anjou Gigliato

977992.jpg

This is a large hammered coin at well over an inch in diameter. Robert of Anjou Gigliato of Avignon mint. The obverse features Robert seated with an orb and sceptre and a lion either side of him.

 

The reverse features a very ornate cross fleuree with each quarter dominated by a lis. Robert was a very powerful figure in Europe at the time, (1309-1343). He was King of Naples, titularly King of Jerusalem, Count of Provence & Forcalquier, Duke of Calbria and ruler of many other parts of Italy.

 

The design of this coin, and its size, has really captivated me. So different from its English counterparts. I do believe this to be a contemporary forgery. I understand that such coins were copied in places such as Rhodes and then shipped to the mainland for circulation.

 

Such a beautiful example of Medieval art which has both numismatic and, due to its brilliant quality forgery, social history as this was contemporaneously made to be circulated as a genuine example alongside genuine pieces.

 

Saor Alba's Scottish Coronation Medal by Nicholas Briot, handed out by King Charles I in 1633

977048.jpg

A fascinating memento from Scottish and British history, this AR medal by Nicholas Briot was struck in 1633 to commemorate Charles I's very belated Scottish coronation that year. His coronation should have been much earlier, he ascended the throne in 1625, but he carelessly delayed said coronation until finally giving into demands that it be done in 1633. His introduction of Anglican liturgy into the coronation ceremony did little to endear him to his Scottish subjects, and things went decidedly sour thereafter. On his return trip to London his baggage including many crown jewels were lost in the Firth of Forth, just off of Burntisland. Subsequently alleged witches were brought to trial in London, on charges of causing the shipwreck. Things went down for Charles I from there on, both in Scotland and in England.

 

This lovely medal, with a lifelike portrait of the monarch, was commissioned to Nicholas Briot, a famous and skilled coiner. This medal was struck in a screw press, and is actually much better detailed as a result. One of these medals was struck piedfort in gold, which was presented to the King, he kept it as a pocket piece until his death in 1649. The silver examples like this one were thrown by the king to the crowds at the coronation ceremony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The winner of this thread is:

 

Saor Alba's Scottish Coronation Medal by Nicholas Briot, handed out by King Charles I in 1633

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...