Jump to content
CoinPeople.com
Sign in to follow this  
Mark Stilson

Holes in coins

Recommended Posts

Thanks guys,thats really interesting.Does that mean we could or pretty much should totally discount the mintage figures for pre 64 silver do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO the only thing that should be discounted is relative rarity. To use an example - lots of 1949D dimes would had got scrapped. But since the 1949S is a better date, it's likely that many were spared from the melting pot.

 

As weird as it sounds, it is quite possible that as silver coins continue to be melted down, that eventually some "common dates" might actually become scarcer than some of the "semi-keys"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dunno :ninja: Depends on when coin collecting/hoarding became popular i guess.

 

I would say almost all high grade coins that were made into jewelery would had not otherwise been saved. Collecting in decades past was a relatively much more expensive hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

899184.jpg

 

Putting Holes in coins is not always for decoration! The practice of holing counterfeit and European copy Edward I,II,& III coins was practised, mainly because the general populace were pretty ignorant. I presume it was officials that pierced them, but left them in circulation because of the shortage of coins, probably at a lesser value! :ninja:

BTW. The coin shown is William 1337-91 of Namur, a Crockard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As weird as it sounds, it is quite possible that as silver coins continue to be melted down, that eventually some "common dates" might actually become scarcer than some of the "semi-keys"

 

 

I think that's very much possible!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IMO the only thing that should be discounted is relative rarity. To use an example - lots of 1949D dimes would had got scrapped. But since the 1949S is a better date, it's likely that many were spared from the melting pot.

 

As weird as it sounds, it is quite possible that as silver coins continue to be melted down, that eventually some "common dates" might actually become scarcer than some of the "semi-keys"

 

Thats kinda what i meany by discounting mintage figures for pre 64 silver , thanks ,Im regretting selling as many Mercs as i did now..sort of , mostly kept the choicest ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way I don't think this "unknown" rarity is unique to US coins alone. Lots of world silver got scooped up in the big silver melt as well. A buddy of mine figures that somewhere around 10-12% of the 20th Century UK silver coins were destoryed. Don't know what he bases that on but he's been collecting UK since the late 50's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was always told a lot of the Uk Silver coins were melted down to pay the war debt after WWll , presumably owed to the US.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some entire shipments of Dutch coins were also melted down immediately post-WWII.

 

As for the UK, they went to an extreme post war - the standard (silver) war medals were made of c/n!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how many other European countries had these war debts,quite a few id imagine.Paid in the silver coinage of the day,leaving us with worthless garbage really.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the 70's my brother bought a $1,000 face value bag of silver coins. Everything from dimes to halves. Lot of almost dateless coins in there. What surprised me though was the barbers. Looking back and at ebay now they are still out there and on the bay. He really worked that deal. Bought when it was about $30 an ounce and waited till it made it back to $25. Missed the high point completely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's really annoying me is the best error coin in my collection, an 1872 brockage penny (My avatar) has a hole (Had a ring loop through it until I removed it) presumably was worn on a chain or cord due to it being an oddity.

 

1872brock.jpg

 

Such a shame :ninja:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a great coin. Perhaps the hole is what saved it from a terrible fate of total destruction. The fact that someone cared for it all those years may be a good thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×