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PCI2010 Group 10 - Your Specials: Submission

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Don't forget the format.

 

your id; coin id info; group

 

omnicoin link

 

 

description information (optional but recommended)

 

 

 

GO FOR IT.

 

 

 

This thread will close either when there are 100 entries or on 10th February at 5PM.

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Saor Alba - Your Specials - Scottish Coronation Medal by Nicholas Briot, handed out by King Charles I in 1633

 

Scottish Coronation Medal by Nicholas Briot

 

A fascinating memento from Scottish and British history, this AR medal by Nicholas Briot was struck in 1633 to commemorate Charles I's very belated Scottish coronation that year. His coronation should have been much earlier, he ascended the throne in 1625, but he carelessly delayed said coronation until finally giving into demands that it be done in 1633. His introduction of Anglican liturgy into the coronation ceremony did little to endear him to his Scottish subjects, and things went decidedly sour thereafter. On his return trip to London his baggage including many crown jewels were lost in the Firth of Forth, just off of Burntisland. Subsequently alleged witches were brought to trial in London, on charges of causing the shipwreck. Things went down for Charles I from there on, both in Scotland and in England.

 

This lovely medal, with a lifelike portrait of the monarch, was commissioned to Nicholas Briot, a famous and skilled coiner. This medal was struck in a screw press, and is actually much better detailed as a result. One of these medals was struck piedfort in gold, which was presented to the King, he kept it as a pocket piece until his death in 1649. The silver examples like this one were thrown by the king to the crowds at the coronation ceremony.

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bill; Thomas Elder Satirical Token; Group 10

 

http://omnicoin.com/coins/952567.jpg

 

My favorite satirical token wherein Thomas Elder calls Farren Zerbe an ass by portraying him as a zebra stripped mule.

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elverno; 1798 1 Pfenning, Rostock; Group 10 - Your Specials

http://omnicoin.com/coins/926880.jpg

 

This off-center piece probably survived in this condition because it was off-centered, and collected by an early error collector!

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elverno; 1795 3 Kreuzer, Wurzburg; Group 10 - Your Specials

http://omnicoin.com/coins/921032.jpg

 

A commemorative issued upon the death of Bishop Franz Ludwig, struck on 3 kreuzer planchets.

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ikaros; 1971 Lunar Commemorative; Group 10

http://www.omnicoin.com/coin_view.aspx?id=977402

Franklin Mint lunar commemorative metallion made from a melt that included silver sent to the moon on Apollo XIV -- hard to get a good scan of this because of its packaging.

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Hussulo, 1862 Portugal 5000 Reis Ex. Eliasberg NGC AU55, Group 10

 

I was inspired to start collecting World gold coins after looking through Eliasbergs World gold sale catalogue by Stack's. ELIASBERGCOVER.JPG

Eliasberg amassed a lot of his coins by buying complete collections but the reason why the coin below is special to me is because he personally chose and handled it during his trip to Spain in 1971.

 

http://www.omnicoin.com/coins/977416.jpg

 

Lot No. 679 1862 Portugal 5000R. Purchased on Louis Eliasberg's trip to Spain 1971.

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YeOldeCollector - Robert of Anjou Gigliato - Group Ten

 

http://www.omnicoin.com/coins/977992.jpg

 

This is a large hammered coin at well over an inch in diameter. Robert of Anjou Gigliato of Avignon mint. The obverse features Robert seated with an orb and sceptre and a lion either side of him.

 

The reverse features a very ornate cross fleuree with each quarter dominated by a lis. Robert was a very powerful figure in Europe at the time, (1309-1343). He was King of Naples, titularly King of Jerusalem, Count of Provence & Forcalquier, Duke of Calbria and ruler of many other parts of Italy.

 

The design of this coin, and its size, has really captivated me. So different from its English counterparts. I do believe this to be a contemporary forgery. I understand that such coins were copied in places such as Rhodes and then shipped to the mainland for circulation.

 

Such a beautiful example of Medieval art which has both numismatic and, due to its brilliant quality forgery, social history as this was contemporaneously made to be circulated as a genuine example alongside genuine pieces.

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YeOldeCollector - Edward the Confessor Jewellery Penny - Group Ten

 

http://www.omnicoin.com/coins/977035.jpg

 

This coin is an example of Edward the Confessor's "Expanding Cross" penny. All Anglo-Saxon pennies of this era were struck from silver blanks and this is of no exception. However, you should notice that one side is gold in colour, I shall explain why later. The photos really do not do it justice, its slightly wavy flan prevent true photos from being taken by myself.

 

The obverse legend, starting at 12 O'clock, reads "+EDP RDREX" which means King Edward. The obverse depicts a diademed bust facing left with a trefoil-headed sceptre in front.

 

The reverse legend, also starting at 12 O'clock, reads "+GODRICONLVNDE:" which is essentially Godric on Lvnde which signifies that Godric was responsible for minting this coin at London. The reverse features a short voided cross with expanding limbs joined at the base by two circles.

 

 

This coin was made into a brooch, one would suspect it to be contemporary as he marked the end of Anglo-Saxon reign it seems unlikely that the Norman reign would have seen such actions. I suspect that it was done by someone of wealth as it would be have been rather expensive to get something made of solid silver to be coated on one side in gold and then to have two silver pins put through the reverse all by hand. Bearing in mind that the two silver pins would most likely have been connected by a silver bar clasp then this is a high status symbol of wealth. Perhaps a nobleman or a very wealthy merchant would have worn such an item to display the wealth. As the reverse is gilded and the king's portrait is facing the wearer and not on display, one can assume that it was not worn as some sort of monarch-support badge like we see in the Cromwellian/Charles civil war of the 17th Century.

 

These brooches really are quite scarce and one like this is even more so as it still has its original pins and the coin shows very little wear if any. The level of detail remaining is literally as if it has just left the mint with the gilding reducing the relief somewhat.

 

A coin that is not too far off one thousand years old is nothing special as they can be quite easy to acquire. A coin of that age of English origin makes it a little scarcer but to have something of that age with the social ideology intertwined with the history is something that I find exceptionally impressive. I want to know who made it, who owned it, how it was lost and why was it made. I cannot help but wonder what sort of person last wore it as it sits on the palm of a hand the 21st Century, glistening in the light.

 

This is something I consider to be 'Special' as it is not just a coin but a status symbol and something which has another practical use.

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YeOldeCollector - Edward the Confessor Jewellery Penny - Group Ten

 

http://www.omnicoin.com/coins/977035.jpg

 

This coin is an example of Edward the Confessor's "Expanding Cross" penny. All Anglo-Saxon pennies of this era were struck from silver blanks and this is of no exception. However, you should notice that one side is gold in colour, I shall explain why later. The photos really do not do it justice, its slightly wavy flan prevent true photos from being taken by myself.

 

The obverse legend, starting at 12 O'clock, reads "+EDP RDREX" which means King Edward. The obverse depicts a diademed bust facing left with a trefoil-headed sceptre in front.

 

The reverse legend, also starting at 12 O'clock, reads "+GODRICONLVNDE:" which is essentially Godric on Lvnde which signifies that Godric was responsible for minting this coin at London. The reverse features a short voided cross with expanding limbs joined at the base by two circles.

 

 

This coin was made into a brooch, one would suspect it to be contemporary as he marked the end of Anglo-Saxon reign it seems unlikely that the Norman reign would have seen such actions. I suspect that it was done by someone of wealth as it would be have been rather expensive to get something made of solid silver to be coated on one side in gold and then to have two silver pins put through the reverse all by hand. Bearing in mind that the two silver pins would most likely have been connected by a silver bar clasp then this is a high status symbol of wealth. Perhaps a nobleman or a very wealthy merchant would have worn such an item to display the wealth. As the reverse is gilded and the king's portrait is facing the wearer and not on display, one can assume that it was not worn as some sort of monarch-support badge like we see in the Cromwellian/Charles civil war of the 17th Century.

 

These brooches really are quite scarce and one like this is even more so as it still has its original pins and the coin shows very little wear if any. The level of detail remaining is literally as if it has just left the mint with the gilding reducing the relief somewhat.

 

A coin that is not too far off one thousand years old is nothing special as they can be quite easy to acquire. A coin of that age of English origin makes it a little scarcer but to have something of that age with the social ideology intertwined with the history is something that I find exceptionally impressive. I want to know who made it, who owned it, how it was lost and why was it made. I cannot help but wonder what sort of person last wore it as it sits on the palm of a hand the 21st Century, glistening in the light.

 

This is something I consider to be 'Special' as it is not just a coin but a status symbol and something which has another practical use.

 

Brevity is the soul of wit...

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YeOldeCollector - George III Enamelled Brooch - Group Ten

 

http://www.omnicoin.com/coins/978000.jpg

 

A superbly executed enamelled crown of George III, most likely 1819. Very rich colours on the reverse.

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