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Lord's Prayer Tokens

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1909 Hudson-Fulton Celebration (I like the hanger as well as the medal): Bill

 

So do I, it intrigued me as the designed of the steamboat was not known to me. You probably know all the following but for anybody that does not;

 

North River Steamboat or North River also known as Clermont, thought by many to be the first commercially viable steamboat. Of note are the fly wheels slightly afore the paddle wheels. Built in 1807 designed by Robert Fulton with the financial backing of Robert Livingston, who had the exclusive rights to steam navigation on the Hudson, NY. The steam engine though designed by Fulton was manufactured in Birmingham, England by Bolton & Watt, so there is a connection to numismatics! A replica was built for the celebrations in 1909 and was featured on a stamp.

 

That is my 2 cents worth!

Fulton_on_Hudson_1909_Issue-2c.jpg

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A couple new purchases.

 

1877, second year of the US Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. The medal was struck on the US Mint first steam press, purchased by George B. Soley. He travelled to various expositions striking Lord's Prayer medals to sell as souvenirs. The press stands in the entrance atrium of the ANA today.

 

1024070.jpg

 

Another McKinley Lord's Prayer Medal, this one dated 1901.

 

1024069.jpg

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Very nice Bill. Nice tokens and information.

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Soley was a die sinker with a shop on Chestnut Street in Philadelphia, and also worked at the mint. He struck medals at every fair and exposition from the time he bought the steam press as surplus until he died around 1905, frequently with the Lord's Prayer on the reverse. He also bought the 12.7mm collars used to strike gold dollars, and struck medals in that size before the crowds, which he sold for a quarter.

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Soley was a die sinker with a shop on Chestnut Street in Philadelphia, and also worked at the mint. He struck medals at every fair and exposition from the time he bought the steam press as surplus until he died around 1905, frequently with the Lord's Prayer on the reverse. He also bought the 12.7mm collars used to strike gold dollars, and struck medals in that size before the crowds, which he sold for a quarter.

 

This is interesting info. Hadn't heard part about the 12.7mm collars before.

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Nice facts to add to the discussion. Thank you.

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