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Henry III Voided Longcross penny. Lvcas on Gloucester, Class IIIb, less common mint.

 

69698Glov1.jpg

11988Glov2.jpg

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Very nice. Where's that little goldie you've been teasing us with??

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:ninja:

Aren't we missing something?

Very nice. Where's that little goldie you've been teasing us with??

 

 

;)

 

Indeed we are! ;)

 

 

QNoble1.jpg

QNoble2.jpg

 

Edward III Treaty Period Quarter Noble of London mint, dating to circa 1364. Exceptionally sharp detail which isn't captured entirely by the photograph.

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How rare is it? Are you keeping this for your personal collection?

 

It's not overly rare but it's hardly the most common of coins. I mean, there are a fair few examples knocking about but no where near as many as most of the silvers. I imagine we're talking quantity still in the hundreds.

 

Also, all of the coins here are for my personal collection. :ninja:

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I knew it had to be a remarkable coin to divert you from silver. Truly lovely, Clive - and I still say it looks good enough to eat. :ninja:

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It is beautiful. I hope that you enjoy it greatly.

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Truly lovely, Clive - and I still say it looks good enough to eat. ;)

 

:ninja:

 

It would be an expensive snack, to say the least...

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Another'un arrived today.

 

Exeter1-1.jpg

Exeter2-1.jpg

 

Henry III Longcross. Class IIIb, Ion on Exeter and double struck.

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How often do you find a double struck coin that is well centered like this? They didn't use collars, if I understand correctly. Therefore, after the first strike, the coin may have bounced around, the minter would replace it manually, then strike it again.

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How often do you find a double struck coin that is well centered like this? They didn't use collars, if I understand correctly. Therefore, after the first strike, the coin may have bounced around, the minter would replace it manually, then strike it again.

 

Double struck coins are normally, as you suggest, rather 'out of place'. I liked this one because it had a full flan as well as being fairly centrally struck, capturing all of the detail. Normally they can be quite indecipherable and ugly.

 

I shall post some photographs of a couple of my other doublestruck Henry IIIs, ones which I really like. They are not always as good.

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George, as promised, here are some more Henry III double strikes.

 

First off, here's a normal one to relatively compare to.

 

Normal1.jpg

Normal2.jpg

 

 

Here's the first.

 

Multiple1.jpg

Multiple2.jpg

 

Now, this is not just double struck. This penny has been struck in the name of two different moneyers. It was originally struck under Walter on Canterbury but it was then placed under another reverse die and minted in the name of Ion of Canterbury. As you can see, the reverse is brilliantly well-centred whilst the obverse has a reverse striking on it too. A very interesting coin!

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Here's another.

 

TomasYork3b1.jpg

TomasYork3b2.jpg

 

This is a class IIIb in the name of Tomas of York. The obverse reads "+HECVSREXREXIII" rather than "+HENRICVSREXIII". The reverse has distinct remnants of both strikes.

 

Another.

 

WillemOxford3b1.jpg

WillemOxford3b2.jpg

 

Willem on Oxford, IIIb. Neither side fills the coin, yet there are two strikes on each side.

 

 

Another.

 

RicardLincoln3b1.jpg

RicardLincoln3b2.jpg

 

Ricard on Lincoln, IIIb. Textbook example of a double-struck example, literally 'as-struck'.

 

 

Another.

 

NicoleCanterbury5b1.jpg

NicoleCanterbury5b2.jpg

 

This one is reminiscent of a King in a pack of cards. The obverse is exactly the same when rotated 180 degrees, by pure coincidence the striker rotated it almost perfectly. It is a class Vb, Nicole on Canterbury with a distorted reverse cross.

 

George, as you can see, not all errors are unsightly horrors. Many are very interesting examples and prove to us that human error isn't a modern invention! :ninja:

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Excellent. :ninja:

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Here's one of my latest acquisitions.

 

Boh1.jpg

Boh2.jpg

 

I've been meaning to get one for a while, now I finally have.

 

Bohemond III of Antioch helmet-head denier.

 

+BOAMVDNVS on obverse. Star to right of bust, crescent to left.

+AMTIOCNIA on reverse. Crescent in top left quarter.

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Nice coins.

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Here's one of my latest acquisitions.

 

Boh1.jpg

Boh2.jpg

 

I've been meaning to get one for a while, now I finally have.

 

Bohemond III of Antioch helmet-head denier.

 

+BOAMVDNVS on obverse. Star to right of bust, crescent to left.

+AMTIOCNIA on reverse. Crescent in top left quarter.

 

Very nice coin. Though it's hard to believe there were two more people saddled with Bohemond for a name...

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Well, the postman has been quite good to me considering the snow although I am rather shocked to learn that he is still wearing shorts... :ninja:

 

First up is a Quadrilateral Cross on Fleury penny of Henry I. It's from the Pimprez Hoard and is pretty much as-struck. Just a shame that the portrait wasn't better struck in the first place. Still, a very nice coin. Looks like Aedgar on London.

 

Quad1.jpg

Quad2.jpg

 

 

Secondly, I think I've found love... ;)

 

Anjou1.jpg

Anjou2.jpg

 

The size of this piece shocked me! Its diameter is well over an inch... ;)

 

Robert of Anjou Gigliato of Avignon mint. The obverse features Robert seated with an orb and sceptre and a lion either side of him.

 

The reverse features a very ornate cross fleuree with each quarter dominated by a lis.

 

Anjou3.jpg

 

Robert was a very powerful figure in Europe at the time, (1309-1343). He was King of Naples, titularly King of Jerusalem, Count of Provence & Forcalquier, Duke of Calbria and ruler of many other parts of Italy.

 

The design of this coin, and its size, has really captivated me. So different from its English counterparts.

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Very nice coins. You must have a very hardy mailman. Shorts in your weather :ninja:....

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