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Guest Aidan Work

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Very nice. What year are those?

The Argentinian notes are mostly from the 70s and 80s. The Falklands one is from 2012 I think. The others are issued between the early 60s and 90s.

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Very nice notes. Love the Trinidad & Tobago note. I believe that I have a few of those in my collection somewhere.

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I recently got these lovely notes:

 

aanwinsten_zpsvhbnjqco.jpg

aanwinsten1_zps8bnnlhbi.jpg

IMG_1076_zpsevgjtowt.jpg

 

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Very nice notes.

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How do you catalog them in your collection?

 

I use an excel spreadsheet to catalog all my banknotes and I store them randomly in albums made my Leuchtturm (Lighthouse), except voor the Yugoslav issues between 1965 and 2003, because I'm trying to get the full series! In my spreadsheet I order my notes by country, denomination, date, grade, KM#, and remarks (if needed). Here's how it looks like for general European notes, Yugoslavian notes and specialized issues:

 

 

2016-01-15_zpsx1buyeqb.png

2016-01-15%201_zpsmhaxori0.png

2016-01-15%202_zpszyb2awqy.png

 

As you can see, I'd like to use different colors for all the sheets. Red is the only color with a specific meaning, it indicates that the note is not in my collection yet and is on my so-called wishlist. Hope this helps you.

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Very nice organization. Thanks for sharing it with us.

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No problem! ;-)

 

Two more envelopes arrived today, including the following:

 

aanwinsten2_zpsmmhkbi59.jpg

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More nice notes.

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Thanks for sharing. You have a fascinating array of modern common notes. If you know nothing about them, they still present compelling images from distant places and different times. The more you know, the more they tell you. For most people with the collector's passions, completeness and perfection are the axes of measurement.

Some people care a lot about Signatures. Assembling a complete set for each series. With nations such as Brazil or Yugoslavia, that can be a serious challenge - even for the USA which often changes Secretaries of the Treasury at least once every quadrennial administration.

 

Personally, one of my pursuits is Authors (poets, printing, and related). Up above in #3305, you show a block of Hungarian notes. The green 10 (Tiz) Forint shows Sandor Petőfi, the most famous poet of the culture. He was a driving force in the romantic nationalist literary movement of the early 19th century. He died in the 1848 revolutions. In any significant anthology of world literature that offers a survey of poetry, one of his will be included.

 

Similarly, the 1,000 and 10,000 Lei notes of Romania depict their national poet, Mihai Eminescu.

 

If you have any notes from Estonia, you will find their writers on them, also. Estonia is a bit different in that it is the second-most literate nation in the world, as measured by the number of books published per capita in the native language. Back in the Great Depression of the 1930s, when many people were making counterfeit money, Estonians were counterfeiting postage stamps: it is nation of writers.

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Thanks for sharing. You have a fascinating array of modern common notes. If you know nothing about them, they still present compelling images from distant places and different times. The more you know, the more they tell you. For most people with the collector's passions, completeness and perfection are the axes of measurement.

 

Some people care a lot about Signatures. Assembling a complete set for each series. With nations such as Brazil or Yugoslavia, that can be a serious challenge - even for the USA which often changes Secretaries of the Treasury at least once every quadrennial administration.

 

Personally, one of my pursuits is Authors (poets, printing, and related). Up above in #3305, you show a block of Hungarian notes. The green 10 (Tiz) Forint shows Sandor Petőfi, the most famous poet of the culture. He was a driving force in the romantic nationalist literary movement of the early 19th century. He died in the 1848 revolutions. In any significant anthology of world literature that offers a survey of poetry, one of his will be included.

 

Similarly, the 1,000 and 10,000 Lei notes of Romania depict their national poet, Mihai Eminescu.

 

If you have any notes from Estonia, you will find their writers on them, also. Estonia is a bit different in that it is the second-most literate nation in the world, as measured by the number of books published per capita in the native language. Back in the Great Depression of the 1930s, when many people were making counterfeit money, Estonians were counterfeiting postage stamps: it is nation of writers.

 

Thank you for your reply, I totally agree with you! Personally, I like to collect by countries that have some sort of meaning to me. Those countries are mostly from behind the Iron Curtain and Yugoslavia off course. I got into collecting Yugoslavian notes when I was on a holiday in Croatia. I've visited some beautiful places while I was there and I just loved the way the country looks, it's just so different from what I'm used to and I really liked that! Eastern Bloc notes fascinate me mostly because of their history in the Cold War but also if you look at the history of the individual countries, like you exlained, you find out the nicest things. For example, I was looking through my Czechoslovakian banknotes a few months ago and I just randomly started to type in the names of the national heroes on those notes. After a few clicks I found out that one of those 'heroes' not only meant a lot in Czechoslovakian history, but also in the history of my own country, Holland. It's Jan Amos Komensky I'm talking about, he was a significant figure in the world of pedagogy and he spent most of his studies here in Amsterdam! We also see him as an important person for our society because he brought us all kinds of new knowledge on how to raise children. As a result, many high schools in the Netherlands are named after him and that's when I realised I recognized his name (in Dutch it's Comenius)! I also googled some of the names of other banknotes and that;s how I learned many things about these national heroes I first never heard about. Funny you told me about the modern Estonian banknotes, because I happen to have a couple of those as well and I didn't know that fact before! I'm glad you schared that with us, I'm certainly going to search more about the national heroes pictured on my banknotes!

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It's een quite while since I've shown something, so here's what I got from the past few weeks:

 

Picasa_zps9rpldri2.jpg

Picasa2_zpsvdhzm2g6.jpg

Picasa4_zpsaptuol1y.jpg

Picasa1_zpssqnhntbi.jpg

Picasa3_zpsdn87e67r.jpg

 

Now I only need 10 more notes to complete my collection of Yugoslavian banknotes! :)

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Very nice. Only 10 to go.That's terrific.

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Banknotes from today :yes:

3005jd2.jpg

Too much for scan but just a little photos

 

Malawi

2vx3xi9.jpg

jkkh39.jpg

 

Malta

2n9ywz5.jpg

fypqwz.jpg

2qio75h.jpg

vspgl2.jpg

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