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Peter I 1721 ruble

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To tell you the truth I did not. But edge variation for that period are not considered very collectable. I have a rouble of 1721 which has an unlisted edge for that year. The coin itself is R1 in Bitkin. But the condition is wanting. Thus, I decided to post this one. The 1724 I posted is even more fun :ninja:

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That's a choice coin with an excellent strike. :ninja:

 

Congratulations!

 

How long have you been collecting Russian coins?

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I have been collecting russian coins for 20 years now. But, I lost my first collection in 1994. Then I was not very active for 3-4 years. Buying a couple of coins a year. Now I am back and for about 3 years I am actively collecting again.

 

As for this rouble -- its problem is that it is a common coin. Yes it is nice, ex. Soderman, but not very exciting. I myself like copper better. To find a copper coin in such condition, now that is a real prize.

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Now you see why I emphasis a bit too much on the edging, is not only because of the different varities of the edging style, but you will never know if it might be a previous European planchet used for such striking. In recent Dimitri Markov auctions, he auctioned some unique overstriked coins, which is quite interesting.

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In recent Dimitri Markov auctions, he auctioned some unique overstriked coins, which is quite interesting.

 

If you are talking about lot #1119, then you are up for a big surprise -- the description in the catalog was BS. I was there and I saw the coin. It probably had a damaged edge, and then some moron made a new edge by hand. It is my opinion of course, and it is not beyond contestation. :lol: But if you look at the picture in the catalog, you will see rim dings going around the whole circumference of the coin. Those are the marks of hand-punching.

 

There were a couple of super rare coins there, like 1707 ruble small head, 1714/3 ruble, etc. But they were far from superb. The above two coins, for instance, were artificially toned. Lot 1087 was superb, however. Too rich for my blood though. The rarest one was 5 kop 1771 lot #1335. That was my favorite. Too bad it did not become mine. :ninja:

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I have been collecting russian coins for 20 years now.  But,  I lost my first collection in 1994.  Then I was not very active for 3-4 years.  Buying a couple of coins a year.  Now I am back and for about 3 years I am actively collecting again.

 

As for this rouble -- its problem is that it is a common coin.  Yes it is nice, ex. Soderman, but not very exciting.  I myself like copper better.  To find a copper coin in such condition, now that is a real prize.

 

I thought that you must be a long-time collector. I like the silver coins the best, but collect other metals as well.

 

This thread is about my favorite coin in my collection (which is a copper coin):

My Favorite Russian coin

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20 years! :lol:

 

And I only collected for 3-4 years :ninja:

 

You might be a relatively new collector of Russian coins, gx, but you learn quickly and whatever you might lack in experience, you more than make up in enthusiasm.

 

Plus, you actually read books to learn about the coins, which is a surprisingly uncommon trait. It never ceases to amaze me how many collectors think that the only things they ever need to read are the latest published bid/ask prices and the assigned grade on a slab.

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gxseries, nothing to worry about -- you will get there. :ninja: Not only that you read the books, but it is also that you analize and compare, it seems. I read your posts from the past as well as your responces. Very soon you will be writing articles like RW Julian (no disrespect to the great schoolar of Russian numismatics). And I am sure they will be pretty good. Just try not to come to conclusions too soon and without seeing the actual coin -- pictures and descriptions in auction catalogs are sometimes misleading. Markov usually is not too bad, but the illness of embelishment is pertinent to all merchants...

 

grivna, I would like a better picture of your plate. If possible, can you make pictures of every stamp separately? It is very interesting that they are all alligned pretty good. Also, it is interesting that there is a trace of misstamped stamp at 9 oclock. Too bad you cannot photograph the back of it. Very interesting specimen indeed.

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grivna, I would like a better picture of your plate.  If possible, can you make pictures of every stamp separately?  It is very interesting that they are all alligned pretty good.  Also, it is interesting that there is a trace of misstamped stamp at 9 oclock.  Too bad you cannot photograph the back of it.  Very interesting specimen indeed.

 

 

The alignment is a function of the die punch array used. Ghosted images of the punches are sometimes seen on the plates. I'm not sure what causes them, but think it might be the result of the array bouncing after striking. See http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/3746/pg0262yy.jpg for a picture of the die punch array used to strike the grivny (courtesy of gx).

 

The back is nothing exciting, just plain metal. The plates are really a uniface issue.

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