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Found 9 results

  1. Forgotten Coins Amazon Books. Use the LOOK INSIDE link to see if its needs to be in your library. Discusses how to detect Chinese Forgeries and their compositions. Kindle version is $3 and Amazon Kindle APP is FREE to download to your desktop. Discusses Counterfeits from 1500-Present with over 1000+ XRF Assays! Preface: This book is being dedicated to my good friend Bill Anton who has helped this collector throughout his collecting endeavors in the world of contemporary circulating counterfeit (contemporary counterfeits) collecting. I first met Bill during my early days of collecting New Jersey State Coppers. Bill did live close by to me so we did see each other often and did discuss various topics of colonial coin collecting. This eventually led of course to the collecting of contemporary counterfeits. Since the initial book on the Forgotten Coins of the North American Colonies was published in 1992 by Krause Publications there has been much advancement of these contemporary counterfeits by American & Foreign collectors. This book is not so much a research exercise into new areas of contemporary counterfeit collecting but a tribute to an individual who started many people in collecting these coins when at this time in 1992 few if any collectors thought of collecting contemporary counterfeits. Today most collectors of any advanced collecting interest have associated contemporary counterfeits in their collection. Today if I do meet a collector with no contemporary counterfeits in their collection I do question how advanced this collector is or putting it more plainly his “breadth” of knowledge in his field of collecting. Contemporary Counterfeits sort of rounds out the collector in his collecting pursuits and distinguishes him from just being as Bill always indicated a simple minded accumulator. The purpose of this book will be to discuss certain areas that the author is familiar with and to bring this information to its current level of understanding. A good definition is a definition we used for the Counterfeit Eight Reales book released in September 2014 by Amazon Books. A Contemporary Counterfeit is defined as a spurious coin made to circulate alongside originals in day to day commerce at the same value, regardless of face value or design type. See the Definitions section within this book. Specifically, the author will discuss the Canadian Blacksmiths, Spanish/American counterfeits (i.e., Kleeberg Two Reales and the Gurney/Nichols/Lorenzo Eight Reales), English and Irish Halfpence/Farthing contemporary counterfeits principally sold in the Stacks 2008 Michael Ringo Collection and other brief treatments of counterfeits mentioned in the Forgotten Book. The reason I use the word brief as it may take two or three volumes to address all these advancements. Most of the advancements are seen for the U.S. Colonial issues in the American Numismatic Society’s Colonial Newsletter in which the serious student is urged to join the ANS and subscribe to the Colonial Newsletter. The book will also address all the Anton-Kesse Plate coins in the book and bring their cataloguing into modern thinking such as incorporating certain pieces into now accepted counterfeit families such as the Long-Neck Family of counterfeit British Halfpence. Much of these writings of these new contemporary counterfeit Families as previously alluded to has been published through the Colonial Newsletter which is now overseen by the American Numismatic Society. It was Byron Weston of Pennsylvania who initially coined the phrase “linked fingerprints” which establishes relationships between similar contemporary counterfeits having the same dies and who also linked the British Halfpence counterfeits to another series called the Evasions addressed first by Atkins in the late 19th Century and then further advanced by Cobwright. These relationships are what the contemporary counterfeit collectors call today as the study of these “Families” which have similar characteristics. The link fingerprint consist of three basic elements as initially described by Weston: die sharing, punch linkage and design style. Since this time there has been some controversy on which pieces belong to which Family and what to call these Families. Clem Schettino was also instrumental in initially naming these contemporary counterfeit Families within the sphere of British/Irish Halfpence. No small task as current estimates are about 10,000 Families with only maybe 50 charted. As farthings are an order of magnitude rarer overall than halfpence as of this writing no Family has been published in this denomination in the ANS Colonial Newsletter as of this publication date. The author will be using the Schettino Classification System (CVS: Clement V. Schettino) within this book from his latest CD which treats most of the current Families. When William Anton wrote his book in 1992 with Bruce Kesse he had to go back to D.T. Batty who in 1868 published the work: The Descriptive Catalogue of the Copper Coinage of Great Britain, Ireland, British Islands and Colonies in his 1886 address to the American Numismatic and Archaeological Society titled “Counterfeit Halfpence Current in the American Colonies.” We then waited almost a century before another great numismatist who as of this writing has past the centurion age mark Eric P. Newman contributed his classic work at the time “American Circulation of English Bungtown Halfpence which constituted a chapter in Studies of Money in Early America in 1976. From these two works we had to wait less than a decade before one of the greatest American collectors (some may argue the top collector and deservedly so) Mike Ringo already started to form his collection which was sold in the Stacks Americana Sale next to my mainline collection of U.S. Colonials primarily State Coppers of New Jersey in 2008. At this point Ringo’s Collection took many of these pieces to a new level and almost to the level of Colonial State Copper collecting such as New Jersey’s, Connecticut’s and Vermont Coppers. It is estimated that roughly over 50% of all U.S. Colonial collectors today do collect some form of contemporary counterfeit whether U.S. or Foreign. As a tribute to Mike Ringo and the finest cabinet of contemporaries to ever cross the auction block as of this date his collection of contemporary counterfeits is included as an Appendix to this anniversary edition. My specialties as of this writing include English & Irish Halfpence/Farthing Contemporaries, John Kleeberg Contemporary Counterfeit 2 Reales, Gurney/Nichols/Lorenzo (GNL) Contemporary Counterfeit Eight Reales, Canadian Blacksmith Coppers and Foreign Contemporary Counterfeits collected between 1500-present. The author collects post-1500 foreign contemporaries for the simplistic reason as that he likes to have a date on the specimen he collects – it’s that simple on why its post-1500. I will take these areas to a higher level through material Analysis when available that was seen in the GNL Contemporary Counterfeit Eight Reales book and describe the different alloys seen in these contemporary counterfeit groups. Even as I write this preface there are collectors of the Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4) that have long formed a sub-group called the non-regal group which are investigating new Families Of English and Irish Halfpence with the current estimate of approximately 10,000 Families! For this reason this book will touch only on the Ringo Collection and specimens plated in the original Forgotten Book as to their current classifications. So it’s the intent of this book at least for this massive contemporary counterfeit Family to just jump start the beginning student into this series with this book and then if interested he can then pursue this series more deeply within C4 the non-regal group. Even though great advancements have been made since the days of D.T. Batty and Eric P. Newman in many ways we have only scratched the surface of the pieces described in the original Forgotten Book and today. A simple reason would be that the non-regal group has not even established a universal variety classification system for the British/Irish Families due to their massive numbers and their inherent complexities. You can begin collecting contemporary counterfeits in several ways: (1) you are reading this book which is a great start in grasping all the potential avenues you can go through in your collecting and possible research venues. (2) Join the American Numismatic Society and subscribe to “The Colonial Newsletter” which has continuous articles on colonials and often contemporary counterfeits, (3) Join the Colonial Coin Collectors Club which publishes the C4 Newsletter and like the Colonial Newsletter can give you a steady stream of new information on contemporary counterfeits, (4) Subscribe to the Stacks/Bowers auction catalogs or keep them on your Favorites on the Internet which particularly in the Americana Sale and C4 Auction venues do always contain an offering of contemporary counterfeits. (5) Seek out writers/numismatists writing in this field, (6) Join the Mexican Numismatic Association (MNA) if your taste in contemporary counterfeits in the Spanish/American area which has just started coing into its own due to recent start of the MNA and finally (6) Use Internet selling venues like E-Bay to read descriptions and study these pieces and learn what is a good buy or bad buy – yes the 1775 English Contemporary Counterfeit Halfpence is the most common collecting date in the selling arena. Irish are more rare then British across the board but if the 1775 English Halfpence is very crude this fact becomes irrelevant. This will be explored further in this book. This book is really a comprehensive learning tool for the new collector not so much the seasoned specialist wanting to venture into contemporaries. My main goal was to try to alleviate these two constant inquires in my E-Mail box over the years: Where do I begin? Is the attached picture a worthy contemporary counterfeit? The Anton Family financially supporting this publication and the author hope you enjoy this edition and as Bill Anton so appropriately mentioned in his 1992 book “It is hoped that other collectors and students of the series will endeavor to correct and expand upon this effort.” Finally an acknowledgement to my wife Maryellen who has put up with my coin obsession for forty years whose background support would not have made this book possible.
  2. Three Versions: CD on EBAY, Kindle E-Book via the FREE Amazon Kindle APP to any device and desktop and Softbound at Amazon Books. Forgotten Coins is my new book. Here is the Preface: This book is being dedicated to my good friend Bill Anton who has helped this collector throughout his collecting endeavors in the world of contemporary circulating counterfeit (contemporary counterfeits) collecting. I first met Bill during my early days of collecting New Jersey State Coppers. Bill did live close by to me so we did see each other often and did discuss various topics of colonial coin collecting. This eventually led of course to the collecting of contemporary counterfeits. Since the initial book on the Forgotten Coins of the North American Colonies was published in 1992 by Krause Publications there has been much advancement of these contemporary counterfeits by American & Foreign collectors. This book is not so much a research exercise into new areas of contemporary counterfeit collecting but a tribute to an individual who started many people in collecting these coins when at this time in 1992 few if any collectors thought of collecting contemporary counterfeits. Today most collectors of any advanced collecting interest have associated contemporary counterfeits in their collection. Today if I do meet a collector with no contemporary counterfeits in their collection I do question how advanced this collector is or putting it more plainly his “breadth” of knowledge in his field of collecting. Contemporary Counterfeits sort of rounds out the collector in his collecting pursuits and distinguishes him from just being as Bill always indicated a simple minded accumulator. The purpose of this book will be to discuss certain areas that the author is familiar with and to bring this information to its current level of understanding. A good definition is a definition we used for the Counterfeit Eight Reales book released in September 2014 by Amazon Books. A Contemporary Counterfeit is defined as a spurious coin made to circulate alongside originals in day to day commerce at the same value, regardless of face value or design type. See the Definitions section within this book. Specifically, the author will discuss the Canadian Blacksmiths, Spanish/American counterfeits (i.e., Kleeberg Two Reales and the Gurney/Nichols/Lorenzo Eight Reales), English and Irish Halfpence/Farthing contemporary counterfeits principally sold in the Stacks 2008 Michael Ringo Collection and other brief treatments of counterfeits mentioned in the Forgotten Book. The reason I use the word brief as it may take two or three volumes to address all these advancements. Most of the advancements are seen for the U.S. Colonial issues in the American Numismatic Society’s Colonial Newsletter in which the serious student is urged to join the ANS and subscribe to the Colonial Newsletter. The book will also address all the Anton-Kesse Plate coins in the book and bring their cataloguing into modern thinking such as incorporating certain pieces into now accepted counterfeit families such as the Long-Neck Family of counterfeit British Halfpence. Much of these writings of these new contemporary counterfeit Families as previously alluded to has been published through the Colonial Newsletter which is now overseen by the American Numismatic Society. It was Byron Weston of Pennsylvania who initially coined the phrase “linked fingerprints” which establishes relationships between similar contemporary counterfeits having the same dies and who also linked the British Halfpence counterfeits to another series called the Evasions addressed first by Atkins in the late 19th Century and then further advanced by Cobwright. These relationships are what the contemporary counterfeit collectors call today as the study of these “Families” which have similar characteristics. The link fingerprint consist of three basic elements as initially described by Weston: die sharing, punch linkage and design style. Since this time there has been some controversy on which pieces belong to which Family and what to call these Families. Clem Schettino was also instrumental in initially naming these contemporary counterfeit Families within the sphere of British/Irish Halfpence. No small task as current estimates are about 10,000 Families with only maybe 50 charted. As farthings are an order of magnitude rarer overall than halfpence as of this writing no Family has been published in this denomination in the ANS Colonial Newsletter as of this publication date. The author will be using the Schettino Classification System (CVS: Clement V. Schettino) within this book from his latest CD which treats most of the current Families. When William Anton wrote his book in 1992 with Bruce Kesse he had to go back to D.T. Batty who in 1868 published the work: The Descriptive Catalogue of the Copper Coinage of Great Britain, Ireland, British Islands and Colonies in his 1886 address to the American Numismatic and Archaeological Society titled “Counterfeit Halfpence Current in the American Colonies.” We then waited almost a century before another great numismatist who as of this writing has past the centurion age mark Eric P. Newman contributed his classic work at the time “American Circulation of English Bungtown Halfpence which constituted a chapter in Studies of Money in Early America in 1976. From these two works we had to wait less than a decade before one of the greatest American collectors (some may argue the top collector and deservedly so) Mike Ringo already started to form his collection which was sold in the Stacks Americana Sale next to my mainline collection of U.S. Colonials primarily State Coppers of New Jersey in 2008. At this point Ringo’s Collection took many of these pieces to a new level and almost to the level of Colonial State Copper collecting such as New Jersey’s, Connecticut’s and Vermont Coppers. It is estimated that roughly over 50% of all U.S. Colonial collectors today do collect some form of contemporary counterfeit whether U.S. or Foreign. As a tribute to Mike Ringo and the finest cabinet of contemporaries to ever cross the auction block as of this date his collection of contemporary counterfeits is included as an Appendix to this anniversary edition. My specialties as of this writing include English & Irish Halfpence/Farthing Contemporaries, John Kleeberg Contemporary Counterfeit 2 Reales, Gurney/Nichols/Lorenzo (GNL) Contemporary Counterfeit Eight Reales, Canadian Blacksmith Coppers and Foreign Contemporary Counterfeits collected between 1500-present. The author collects post-1500 foreign contemporaries for the simplistic reason as that he likes to have a date on the specimen he collects – it’s that simple on why its post-1500. I will take these areas to a higher level through material Analysis when available that was seen in the GNL Contemporary Counterfeit Eight Reales book and describe the different alloys seen in these contemporary counterfeit groups. Even as I write this preface there are collectors of the Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4) that have long formed a sub-group called the non-regal group which are investigating new Families Of English and Irish Halfpence with the current estimate of approximately 10,000 Families! For this reason this book will touch only on the Ringo Collection and specimens plated in the original Forgotten Book as to their current classifications. So it’s the intent of this book at least for this massive contemporary counterfeit Family to just jump start the beginning student into this series with this book and then if interested he can then pursue this series more deeply within C4 the non-regal group. Even though great advancements have been made since the days of D.T. Batty and Eric P. Newman in many ways we have only scratched the surface of the pieces described in the original Forgotten Book and today. A simple reason would be that the non-regal group has not even established a universal variety classification system for the British/Irish Families due to their massive numbers and their inherent complexities. You can begin collecting contemporary counterfeits in several ways: (1) you are reading this book which is a great start in grasping all the potential avenues you can go through in your collecting and possible research venues. (2) Join the American Numismatic Society and subscribe to “The Colonial Newsletter” which has continuous articles on colonials and often contemporary counterfeits, (3) Join the Colonial Coin Collectors Club which publishes the C4 Newsletter and like the Colonial Newsletter can give you a steady stream of new information on contemporary counterfeits, (4) Subscribe to the Stacks/Bowers auction catalogs or keep them on your Favorites on the Internet which particularly in the Americana Sale and C4 Auction venues do always contain an offering of contemporary counterfeits. (5) Seek out writers/numismatists writing in this field, (6) Join the Mexican Numismatic Association (MNA) if your taste in contemporary counterfeits in the Spanish/American area which has just started coing into its own due to recent start of the MNA and finally (6) Use Internet selling venues like E-Bay to read descriptions and study these pieces and learn what is a good buy or bad buy – yes the 1775 English Contemporary Counterfeit Halfpence is the most common collecting date in the selling arena. Irish are more rare then British across the board but if the 1775 English Halfpence is very crude this fact becomes irrelevant. This will be explored further in this book. This book is really a comprehensive learning tool for the new collector not so much the seasoned specialist wanting to venture into contemporaries. My main goal was to try to alleviate these two constant inquires in my E-Mail box over the years: Where do I begin? Is the attached picture a worthy contemporary counterfeit? The Anton Family financially supporting this publication and the author hope you enjoy this edition and as Bill Anton so appropriately mentioned in his 1992 book “It is hoped that other collectors and students of the series will endeavor to correct and expand upon this effort.” Finally an acknowledgement to my wife Maryellen who has put up with my coin obsession for forty years whose background support would not have made this book possible.
  3. Easy to identify fake with an error in the text "ПЛЛТИНЫ" instead "ПЛАТИНЫ" and ... https://www.ebay.com/itm/COPPER-PATTERN-1842-IMPERIAL-RUSSIA-PLATINUM-3-ROUBLES-PROOF-PF-PR-RUSSIAN-/332428884335?
  4. Recently came across someone selling a Restrike Copy Of Straits Settlement $1 1909. As I didn't heard of a restrike for 1909, so I become curious and brought it from the person. From the pics, it looks like unc and new like prooflike coins. But once you got the coin, you see a big different. 1. Dia. 37.9mm instead of 34mm 2. weight : 26.66g (for 1903,04 with dia. 37mm, for 34mm should be 20g) 3. Non magnetic What I can said is nowadays, fake coins are making it so real even for the weights and sizes, it's really become worry for the coin collectors on finding a true real coins. As we know Straits Settlements $1 have silver content, so I did a few tests on it and failed the test, that's why I concluded this coin is fake. The tests I done are; 1. Sound test. This coin doesn't give a high and long pitch, it's give those sound like a copper-nickel pitch. 2. Magnet resistant test. As we know, silver is non magnetic and have some resistant to earth magnet. This held in a 45 degree angle, the earth magnet slide down without any resistant unlike my other silver coins. I not only brought this coin from him, I also brought a 1904B Straits Settlements coin. Amazing looking isn't it? 1. Dia. 37.9mm 2. Weight : 26.67g 3. Non magnetic 4. The artist's initials "DES" From the data above, one's will thought this is a real 1904B isn't it? But after the tests, it also proven is fake. How amazing that people can fake it so real. Even looking at sidney post on how to identify fake and real 1904 straits settlements coin, I think we coin collectors also need to upgrade ourself to able to detect all those fake coin from real.
  5. Is this 1896-S Morgan dollar real? I see a die issue near one of the stars by the hair, and I don't see that on any VAM web page. It does NOT stick to a magnet and when I drop it it sounds like silver. I will weigh it at the coin shop saturday.
  6. I recently looked in an old purse of mine and found a very strange British pound coin. It's dated 1984 and has the thistle and royal diadem design on the back. On the heads side there is a little star with a clear gem in the center. I immediately started searching the internet but I couldn't find any other coins like it or anyone who had heard of this. I thought it might be fake but it looks and feels legitimate and it would be odd for someone faking coins to put effort into making it stand out. Not being able to find any info at all on this coin is driving me crazy. Have any of you seen anything like this before? http://s24.photobucket.com/user/franc10/media/P1040140_zpsigkiop8j.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1 http://s24.photobucket.com/user/franc10/media/P1040135_zpsp1lnu4vd.jpg.html?sort=3&o=2 http://s24.photobucket.com/user/franc10/media/P1040132_zpsiclyuy9i.jpg.html?sort=3&o=3 http://s24.photobucket.com/user/franc10/media/P1040145_zps4it1j7pm.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0 EDIT: Could someone have had it modified for some reason? Have you heard of anyone doing that?
  7. I've wondering how one learns to detect counterfeit notes? I'm curious in general if there are any techniques that are universally applicable to banknote counterfeit detection. Surely people at PMG aren't expects in every single world currency, so what sort of ways to they check the authenticity of a note? More specifically, I've been collecting the hyperinflation notes of Zimbabwe recently.The anti-counterfeiting features obvious to me on those notes are: -foil strip -patterns visible when held up to light -small UV threads randomly dispersed on note -distinct features only visible under magnification (and thus presumably harder to replicate with printers?) I've never seen a fake note or even really seen a credible report online of fake ones existing so I have nothing to compare the notes to. Every note I see has the features above when examined closely. There are some small inconsistencies. Miscuts are pretty common and I've even noticed whole bundles of notes that are larger than they should be by about a millimeter. Some notes seem thicker than others. Basically, is visual confirmation that all the above mentioned things are present a good sign that the note is real? Are those prohibitively expensive enough to replicate to make it in practical to produce fake notes by the brick? Should I be worried by other note irregularities if all of the above features are fine? Any input on this topic would be greatly appreciated!
  8. Hi! Thanks for having me here! Im new to collecting and something terrible has caught my attention. Apparently there are loads of counterfeit coins going around and I was hoping someone could give me some advice on how to avoid/spot them. Thanks!
  9. Hi everyone. On my trip to Bangkok in June, I bought quite a few 10Bhat commemorative coins from Chatuchak weekend market. I was charged a premium of 5Bhat per coin on average. But this being thailand, I fear that the coins may be fake. The design seems very sharp and the coins seem in a very good condition with excellent lusture (new-like). The edges are raised on both sides. Do you guys know about extent of forgery in such coins? Thanks
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