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aboutfarthings.co.uk

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About aboutfarthings.co.uk

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    http://www.aboutfarthings.co.uk

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    Farthings, more farthings, more farthings and British Commonwealth coins!!!!

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  1. Hi, Thanks for the positive comments. I am always interested in extra images fo rthe site, I am due to be adding the Jamaica section shortly, so images for this section would be really useful. I am always interested in talking to fellow farthing collectors. Contact me via the website if you want. Many Thanks Colin G.
  2. Numinen, A bit late, but thankyou for the kind comments
  3. Blackhawk, There are certainly several varieties available, and I do not believe they are as rare as the price books make them out to be, although they are difficult to obtain in higher grades. As of yet there is no real price difference in the different die types, but this mainly due to the fact that they are not identified anywhere with associated rarities. I am aware of a few varieties and am currently trying to identify the different die varieties and scarcities. I have two distinct types listed on my site with images at present, and have images of a few other die varieties ( the one on ebay is not a die I have seen before, it has very peculiar datal alignment). There is also the added issue that some appear to have the 5 struck over a 3 or both 2 & 3. If you are the owner of either coin, I would certainly be interested in scanned images of the coins to allow me to compare them to the other dies and also to facilitate me adding them to the site. You can contact me via PM or via the website, and as an added bonus you get a mention on the site for your contribution (what more could anyone want ). The relevant page for the 1865 farthings is Aboutfarthings 1865 Page
  4. Okay everyone, not quite on the same scale as the recent Hus giveaways, but in support of Coins GB and the Encased Collectors International (ECI), I am giving away the following in a free giveaway via the Coins GB forum: An encased UNC 1956 farthing which are currently being sold by the ECI ( limited encased decimal pennies and predecimal halfpennies are also available), link provided below: Encased Collectors International They are very limited in numbers (only 8 of the 1956 farthings have been encased) and they could turn out to be a future collectable. Encased coins (also known as lucky pennies, ringed farthings) are coins that were encased predominantly for advertising purposes, and they were very popular in the USA, with several examples also produced in the UK and Canada. All of the UK examples of which I am currently aware are listed on my site, link provided to the images below: Ringed Farthings The encasement of coins is still carried out, but on a much smaller scale with mainly numismatic bodies using them for coin fairs, anniversaries etc, although there are a few people who have used them to commemmorate personal events. To also add to this I am throwing in an 1879 (scarcer Large 9 variety) farthing. And finally for the error collectors, a 1943 Ceylon Cent which shows signs of a severely clashed die, George's complete portrait outline can be seen on the reverse. I will post the coins to the winner anywhere in the world free of charge. THE RULES Anyone who responds to the giveaway post on the COINSGB.COM forum indicating their interest will have their names placed into a draw, the winner will be chosen at random from the names submitted. This giveaway ends Monday 5th Nov. 2007 20:00 GMT all entries must be in by then. Only one entry allowed per person, the winner will be announced later that night. Good luck to all who enter!! Many Thanks, Colin G www.aboutfarthings.co.uk
  5. Revision A.......... LSD (L = Pounds, S = Shillings and D = Pence) 240 pennies in a pound 20 shilling in a pound 10 florins to a pound 5 shillings in a crown 2 shillings to a florin 60 pennies in a crown 30 pennies in a halfcrown 12 pennies in a shilling 2 halfpennies in a penny 4 farthings in a penny Denominations - Smallest to Largest Quarter Farthing - 16 to a penny, a staggering 3840 in a pound!!! Third Farthing Half Farthing Farthing also known as a 1/4d Halfpenny also known as a 1/2d or "ha'pennies"(Plural Halfpence) Penny also known as a 1d (Plural Pence) Penny Halfpence also known as 1 1/2d Twopence also known as a "tuppence" Threepence also known as a 3d, "thrupence" or "joey" (Brass commonly called a thrupenny bit) Fourpence also known as a "Groat" Sixpence also known as a 6d or "Tanner" Shilling also known as 1/- or a "Bob" Two Shillings also known as a "Florin" or 2/- Four Shillings also known as a "Double Florin" or 4/- Half Crown also known as 2/6 or "2'n'6" Five shillings also known as a "Crown" Phew I think thats it
  6. Johnny, I think the plastic they used in these sets and the "first decimal sets" did not help, I have seen many of these that have developed the dreaded green gunge. As you say the sludge will only get worse over time, and in many cases a light rub with a cotton cloth will visually remove most/all of this, if you do not want to head down the chemical route, but there are no guarantees it will not return.
  7. Thanks for the additions , I know a few poeple have asked about the system, so at least this post gives them a good starting point.
  8. Predecimal system - I think I have got it right I have no doubt someone will shout up if it is wrong!! LSD (L = Pounds, S = Shillings and D = Pence) 240 pennies in a pound 20 shilling in a pound 10 florins to a pound 5 shillings in a crown 2 shillings to a florin 60 pennies in a crown 30 pennies in a halfcrown 12 pennies in a shilling 2 halfpennies in a penny 4 farthings in a penny Farthing also known as a 1/4d Halfpenny also known as a 1/2d or "ha'pennies"(Plural Halfpence) Penny also known as a 1d (Plural Pence) Threepence also known as a 3d, "thrupence" or "joey" (Brass commonly called a thrupenny bit) Sixpence also known as a 6d or tanner Shilling also known as 1/- or a "bob" Two Shillings also known as a "florin" or 2/- Half Crown also known as 2/6 or "2'n'6" Phew I think thats it
  9. Predecimal system - I think I have got it right I have no doubt someone will shout up if it is wrong!! LSD (L = Pounds, S = Shillings and D = Pence) 240 pennies in a pound 20 shilling in a pound 10 florins to a pound 5 shillings in a crown 2 shillings to a florin 60 pennies in a crown 30 pennies in a halfcrown 12 pennies in a shilling 2 halfpennies in a penny 4 farthings in a penny Farthing also known as a 1/4d Halfpenny also known as a 1/2d or "ha'pennies"(Plural Halfpence) Penny also known as a 1d (Plural Pence) Threepence also known as a 3d, "thrupence" or "joey" (Brass commonly called a thrupenny bit) Sixpence also known as a 6d or tanner Shilling also known as 1/- or a "bob" Two Shillings also known as a "florin" or 2/- Half Crown also known as 2/6 or "2'n'6" Phew I think thats it
  10. I would agree with both of you, it looks like a proof to me. Can't help but wonder whether some little angel has got their hands on Dad's coin collection and started spending the spendables.
  11. Hussulo, I am with you on this one, they are a very simple design that did not change for many years, which is why many people do not like them, but there is something fascinating about the simplicity of the design. As you say a set can be put together for a fairly reasonable price, and when you look at some of the mintages this is quite amazing!!! A site worth a visit on the subject is Guernsey Coins
  12. These coins were described as "model coins" and were as I understand, issued by coin producers as an example of their products and suggesting denominations/coinage types. The Victorian bimetallic coins produced by Joseph Moore were apparently widely accepted and used as coinage, although they were not legal tender. The coin you have is one of a series which were produced, which included an 1887 version and an 1897 version, they are not particularly rare, but tend to attract quite a bit of interest. On Ebay, the prices really can fluctuate, due to the lack of information about such pieces, but I would tend to say sell for about £3-15 each plus postage (I have seen a couple go for more and also a bit less!!) I understand there are numerous varieties for each of the denominations, and that they are listed in a book called "Toy Coins by Dr Rogers". I have not included them on my site to date, because I have tried to restrict the listings to currency issues. Mainly because it opens up another large area for me to investigate, maybe it is one for the future!! What it may be worth me doing is adding some simple photos and a brief summary on my FAQ page!!
  13. Thanks for all the effort folks!! i have had someone on another forum suggest that it may be a "sweet thorn plant". The image that was provided does seem to match the design of the coin. Trantor it would be brilliant if your friend could confirm this as being the correct plant, I appreciate your efforts. Banivechi, thanks for your work in trying to locate the variety in question.
  14. Thanks for the offer, I suppose a pic would help!!
  15. Lol!! I am in the process of building the "overseas section", and seem to be having some difficulty finding this information to describe the reverse of the coin
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