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Numismatics and Holidays


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#1 Dave

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 06:31 PM

I've been asked to make a thread about this and I thought that I would make it for all holidays so that it can encompass much more than just one holiday. We're starting this one off with Hallowe'en as it's the beginning of the three favorite holidays (at least in the US). I'm not certain that I have much, but I thought I would add some odd creatures and other typical images that are at least associated with the holiday, even though it is certain that they do not have anything to do with Hallowe'en itself. I suppose this may be true of the other holidays as well, but nevertheless, here goes!

Germany has about the best notes for Halloween that I have found. THey have perhaps the only note with a monster name: The Vampire Note: This was from an image in a painting depicting a young german man with a hidden image of a vampire at his neck. Supposed to be a symbol of the WWI War reparations and how the French Government was sucking the life blood out of Germany.

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Again with the German notes, but this time with the Notgeld Issued called Serienschein (series Notes). These local notes were meant to be collected and were not typically used. They depicted a whole host of images, many of them dealing with the folklore of the local areas,which as we can tell from the following notes also encompassed some of teh tales of witchcraft and, I believe, a telling of the story 'Dr. Faustus' featuing the ol'e devil himself as Faustus sells his soul. I'm not quite certain what it is that's happening in them all, but we can get a glimpse of what's going on.


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Romania falls short with it's obvious ties to vampires, but it does have a depiction of a type of sea serpent, the context of which I am unfamiliar, though as it falls into the Monster category, it goes in here:

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As with the last one, I have this one with a great 'monster' on it from Indonesia. Again, I'm not sure of the context, but I'm putting it here because it has fangs and skulls. I use this one as my avatar on a couple of other sites as well.

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And that brings me to Portugal. I've seen some great notes from here - some of the most beautiful ones in my collection, in fact. But this one has a type of demon looking creature. Anyone out there who can tell us exactly what this is?

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How about anyone else? have a coin or paper money that has something that could fit into this thread?

#2 mmarotta

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 07:55 PM

... and, I believe, a telling of the story 'Dr. Faustus' featuing the ol'e devil himself as Faustus sells his soul. I'm not quite certain what it is that's happening in them all, but we can get a glimpse of what's going on.


I had a complete semester in college with Goethe's Faust, Part I. I have not revisited that in many years -- and I sure you, it was hell sitting through 15 sophomoric translations of the greatest work in the German language (second to Luther's Bible, of course). That said... The 25 Pf looks like "Walpurgis Nacht" nominally SAINT Walpurga's Night, but somehow transmogrified into a coven celebration. There was one other scene in which Dr. Faust has his youth restored, but I have a hard time seeing that in the notes, perhaps the smaller 50 Pf at the left. The 1.60 Mark is clearly echoic of a line "es fartzt die Hexe; es stinkt der Bock" -- a line from the ceremony of rejuvenation, I think, or maybe die Walpurgisnacht again: "... a farting witch on a stinking goat..."

The 50 pf top center at the fireplace seated is Faust, to the right standing at the bookcase is Mephisto and behind Faust to the left is the "Familiar" or spirit whom Faust commanded as a servant.

At least, that's my take -- and thanks! Nice array.

Some ancient Greek coins have the gorgon Medusa on them. Apollonia Pontica is famous for them, but see also the coins of L. Plautius Plancus, a Republican moneyer circa 47 BCE.

#3 mmarotta

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 08:03 PM

Christmas --
Attached File  Humbug4.jpg   78.06K   11 downloads

But, also, my sister is more religious so over the years, I sent her several like these:

Attached File  AntiochRam.jpg   17.93K   10 downloads
That from a recent online CNG auction listed on CoinArchives. The significance may be to show the advent of the messiah, the Lamb of God, as the sun moves from Ares and into Pisces. The wise men said, "We have seen his star in the East..." That is taken literally (as so much is) but, as they were WISE men, i.e., astronomers/astrologers, could mean that they read the sign in the stars. Again, the change in vernal equinox from Ares to Pisces (as we now enter the Age of Aguarius), or something else...
... and a more obvious reading of this coin would be to declare Nero ruler of the world...

#4 thedeadpoint

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 10:35 PM

Thanks for starting this, Dave! I hope we see some scary stuff!

#5 Art

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 03:51 PM

Very interesting. A very nice thread.

#6 Dave

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 11:22 PM

Well, it appears that there's not much interest in this thread after all. Well, be that as it may, I'll give it a few more injections before it fades away.

Again for Hallowe'en, there's a great note - This banknote is not mine, though I wish it were. The image is from Ron Wise’s website and the scan was donated by Todd Hunt.

This is a Swiss 1000 Franc banknote from 1971. The reverse depicts “The Danse Macabre”, or the Dance of the Dead, which is a depiction of death gathering souls to dance along their way to the grave. There were many paintings of the Danse Macabre done throughout history, the first being in 1424. Over the years, these paintings were intended to instill into people who saw them the sense that life is fleeting and that you should not waste your life on vanities and frivolity. Death leads the dance for everyone: the rich and the poor, the pious as well as the heathen, both the young and the old, the ugly as well as the beautiful. Like the Pied Piper, he leads us all to our eventual fate.

Boo!

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#7 Art

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 01:22 AM

Well, it appears that there's not much interest in this thread after all. Well, be that as it may, I'll give it a few more injections before it fades away.

Again for Hallowe'en, there's a great note - This banknote is not mine, though I wish it were. The image is from Ron Wise’s website and the scan was donated by Todd Hunt.

This is a Swiss 1000 Franc banknote from 1971. The reverse depicts “The Danse Macabre”, or the Dance of the Dead, which is a depiction of death gathering souls to dance along their way to the grave. There were many paintings of the Danse Macabre done throughout history, the first being in 1424. Over the years, these paintings were intended to instill into people who saw them the sense that life is fleeting and that you should not waste your life on vanities and frivolity. Death leads the dance for everyone: the rich and the poor, the pious as well as the heathen, both the young and the old, the ugly as well as the beautiful. Like the Pied Piper, he leads us all to our eventual fate.

Boo!

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WOW! That's some neat note.

#8 mmarotta

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 04:27 AM

Does anyone have Maundy Money to post? The topic is Numismatics and the Holidays. A separate Numismatic Halloween topic already exists.

Fourth of July should be easy ...

I suppose that the US Mint "Law Enforcement Officers" commemorative could stand for MAY 1, which is "Labor Day" everywhere in the world where football is soccer, but "Law Day" here.

Not that we actually celebrate "Constitution Day" or the founding of the Marine Corps (November 10), or even Columbus Day, but the US Mint website has a run-down on the modern commemoratives here.

Easily my favorite holiday is "Valentine's Day." The heart symbol comes from the coins of ancient Cyrene, whose silphium plant was pictured on coins because it was a natural contraceptive.

#9 Dave

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 05:15 AM

Well, Hallowe'en is over at my place. It was a decent run with those little Trick or Treaters, but the first of the big three holidays in the US is over and now we're going onto the next one, THanksgiving. Our good friends to the north in Canada have already had their THanksgiving, but we've got another three weeks to go yet for ours. That should give us enough time to place a few nice images from banknotes that have even a slight reference to the big day. Cornucopias, banquets, Native Americans, Pilgrims, Ships, etc, should be easily found on broken banknotes. For me, I'll start this off with a nice $5 note from 1914. On the reverse there are two vignettes, one of Columbus sighting land (should've started this for Columbus day, eh?) and the other is a depiction of the Pilgrims landing at Plymouth. There is another note with a nice vignette of the pilgrims landing - a National Banknote from 1902 - anyone have one to post?


1914 $5

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#10 Art

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 11:44 AM

Here's a nice BEP Souvenir Sheet with the back of US $10000 Federal Reserve Note featuring the Landing of the Pilgrims. It was the largest denomination note ever issued for general circulation. Also on the card is a block of the 5 cents stamps commemorating the 300th Anniversary of the Landing of the Pilgrims.


B100 1986 DCSE 10000 FRN wstamps

I'll get a more detailed scan on this sheet and replace the above image.

#11 mmarotta

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 01:49 PM

One kid came as a Washington Quarter (eagle reverse) and I gave him foreign coins and a banknote with his candy. A parent with kids was dressed as convict, so I gave him a stock certificate: seemed appropriate.

Thanksgiving for me is the MSNS Convention in Dearborn. I have two exhibits to place and I asked the Paper Money Collectors of Michigan if I could deliver a short talk. (I am preparing a presentation for the Numismatic Theaters at the 2011 ANA Conventions.) The Bourse, the Educational Forum, and Board Meeting just about round out the show for me with the Sunday Breakfast capping the event.

For Christmas, I have a post here already up above. In the past, I gave packages of coins, notes, and stock certificates to nieces and nephews, but they are all older now. (So am I. How did that happen?)

Same with Hanukkah. I used to give real gelt to the daughters of our accountant, but they're married now -- though he isn't -- so that's not an option.

I need some holiday cheer...

#12 Dave

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 03:30 PM

Here's a nice BEP Souvenir Sheet with the back of US $10000 Federal Reserve Note featuring the Landing of the Pilgrims. It was the largest denomination note ever issued for general circulation. Also on the card is a block of the 5 cents stamps commemorating the 300th Anniversary of the Landing of the Pilgrims.


<a href="http://www.flickr.co...rt/4566421179/" title="B100 1986 DCSE 10000 FRN wstamps by UGotaHaveArt, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static....84633205e6.jpg" width="500" height="379" alt="B100 1986 DCSE 10000 FRN wstamps" /></a>

I'll get a more detailed scan on this sheet and replace the above image.


That's awesome, Art! I've never seen this one before.... guess I'd better expand my collection to 10,000, huh? hahahaha (ad infinitum)

#13 Dave

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 03:40 PM

That's some schedule you have there, Mike! But it sure beets having nothing to do. Also, kids grow and change.. Me too, only my growing and changing is in the middle these days.

But thanks for reminding me about an important fact that I overlooked and in my haste have forgotten to rectify more than once: This isn't just for US holidays, nor just for Christian holidays. Hannukah, Ramadan, kristalnacht, Japans Emperor's day, Bastille day, you get the idea... This should be open to all holidays the world over. Guy Fawkes day is comming up quick on November 5th.

That said, let's get on with some more posts.

#14 Dave

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Posted 07 November 2010 - 06:52 PM

Well, Thursday November 11, 2010 is Veterans Day in the United States. It is a day that has been reduced to a mere shopping weekend with mild sales discounts, and a postal holiday, but other than that, very few people actually celebrate it. It started as Armistice Day in 1938 to celebrate the end of WWI which officially ended on November 11, 1918. After WWII and the Korean War, it was evident that there was a ned to honor all veterans in all wars, so in 1954 Congress replaced the word "Armistice" with "Veterans". In 1971 the observance was changed to October 25th, but was again changed to November 11 in 1975.

Veterans day is often confused with Memorial day, but there is a strong differance. Memorial day is a day to honor those who've died while serving their country, while Veterans day is meant to honor those veterans who are still living.

I have served in the Reserve, then Active Duty and then finished up my time in the Air National Guard. In fact, I retired from service just this weekend after serving over 21 years. As a small reward to myself I bought a nice piece of MPC as a token of my service: series 681 $1 Military Payment Certificate issued in 1969.

Posted Image Posted Image


And in appreciation of all those who have served, and are continuing to serve, I say "Thank You"! Your efforts and sacrifices are well appreciated.

#15 Art

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Posted 07 November 2010 - 10:24 PM

Here's another Pilgrim celebration goody.


PS03 PHILYMPIA 1970 2

#16 bill

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 03:08 AM

The Pilgrims:

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#17 bill

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 03:12 AM

And a prayer for Veterans' Day:

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#18 ScottO

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 12:14 PM

rememberance day hmm... dunno if i have anything for that one
here is the mayflower
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#19 mmarotta

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 02:43 PM

From 1992-1999, we lived in the village of Fowlerville, Michigan, in Livingston County. Howell is the county seat. These "Turkey Bucks" were promotions from two grocers, VGs and Felpausch's, both in the chain of Spartan independently owned grocers.

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Above from 1993

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Above from 1995

Terms on the back say no limit to the number of turkeys you can get. All coupons must be redeemed 11/15 to 11/24/1993 (11/12 to 11/22/1995). In 1993, you got one Turkey Buck for each $25 in retail purchases (excluding alcohol and tobacco). Also one Turkey Buck for each purchase of special promotional items marked for Turkey Bucks. In 1995, 50cent coupons were given for the purchase of promotional items only.

In 1993, Turkey Bucks could be redeemed for one fresh bird. 12 Turkey Bucks for a 10-14 lb; 18 Turkey Bucks for a 15-18 lb; 24 for a 19-22 lb. In 1995, redemption was for cash value toward the purchase of a Spartan brand frozen bird.

#20 mmarotta

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 08:30 PM

Omnicoin makes some assumptions about dimensions, so the bar is clipped, but it is a one-ounce silver bar with Ebeneezer Scrooge, mottoed "Bah! Humbug!" He clutches a purse presumably full of coins.

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